Author interview: Benedict Macdonald

Did you know that 94% of Britain isn’t built upon, that Snowdonia is larger and emptier than the Maasai Mara National Reserve, or that Scotland’s deer estates alone cover an area twice the size of Yellowstone National Park?  Britain has all the empty space it needs for an epic wildlife recovery.  So what’s stopping it from happening in our country – and how can we turn things around? 

Rebirding: Rewilding Britain and its Birds is a bold roadmap to reverse the decline of bird populations in Britain, suggesting we need to restore ecosystems, rather than modify farmland.

Author, Benedict Macdonald offered his valuable time to answer our questions about his important new contribution to the discussion of rewilding.

Rebirding Author: Benedict McDonald

What inspired you to become so passionate about restoring natural ecosystems?

In 2014, I began writing Rebirding in the certain knowledge that conservation in this country is failing, the birdsong around us is dying out every year, yet we have all the resources, skill and wildlife lobby to turn things around. I hope that in its small way, Rebirding will do for the UK what Sir David Attenborough’s Our Planet is beginning to do for worldwide conservation – to make people realise that nature is essential, profitable and saveable, even now – and that we have all the resources and skill to do so.

Tell us a little about your background and how you became interested in the natural world?

I never remember the moment of first being fascinated by nature, but I do remember that by the time I was five, I would make weekend visits to Berkeley Castle Butterfly Farm and was entranced by watching the butterflies drinking salts from my fingertips, and I began a collection of ones passed to me by the lady running it – after they had died.  Then early trips to the Welsh coast, and Norfolk, transformed that interest into a lifelong love of birds as well.  From there, their plight has drawn me into understanding and studying ecosystems and a far wider understanding of protecting nature.  Since then, my love of the natural world, both as a naturalist and a TV director, has now taken me to over forty countries.

At 14, I first remember telling someone at a dinner party that I wanted to work in wildlife television. Since graduating from university, I’ve been lucky to work on a range of programmes such as Springwatch, The One Show and The Hunt for the BBC.  Last week, aged 31, I attended the premiere of Sir David Attenborough’s Our Planet for Netflix, launching in the Natural History Museum in London. This is the largest conservation series ever made. I work as the researcher and a field director for the Jungles and Grasslands episodes, directing a number of sequences including desert-nesting Socotra cormorants, the secret life of the Alcon Blue butterfly, and the remarkable lives of the world’s only tool-using Orangutans.

In your opinion, what is the most detrimental practice to the wildlife of Britain?

We are often sold the untruth that what happens to British land is necessary for food production. This is almost entirely untrue.  Only the profitable arable farms of the south, and east of our island, provide a bounty of food for our children.  Dairy lawns and sheep farms in fact create tiny volumes of our daily diet relative to the land area they use. For example, 88% of Wales grows lamb, an optional food resource. 

Of the epic wastage, however, the grouse moor is the ultimate. Eight percent of Britain’s land is burned for the creation of 0.0008% of its jobs and a contribution of just 0.005% to our GDP.  For hundreds of years, thousands of beautiful wild animals have been removed, just so that Red Grouse can be turned into living clay pigeons and killed in their thousands once a year.  Even hunters from other countries find this wasteful and disgusting.  This area covers an area twice the size of Yellowstone National Park – blocking jobs and wildlife alike on an epic scale. Hunting estates in Finland or Sweden, by contrast, juggle the ambition of hunters to shoot a few animals with ecosystems of immense beauty and variety.

Wildlife and commerce are often presented as being in conflict, do you think this is a fair assessment, or can land stewardship that favours biodiversity over profit be of economic benefit?

This is surely the greatest imaginary conflict of our time, successful insinuated, perhaps, by the damaging economies that prevent nature from reaching its full economic potential in our country.  In truth, wildlife IS commerce.  Nature IS money. 

Every year, even without a single charismatic megafauna such as Bison, Elk or Lynx running wild in our country, without a ‘Yellowstone’ or ‘Maasai Mara’, the English adult population make just over 3 billion visits to the natural environment each year, spending £21 billion as they do so. In Scotland, nature-based tourism is estimated to produce £1.4 billion per year, along with 39,000 FTE jobs. 

In contrast, the current models of upland farming demand money from us to survive, but they do not reciprocate jobs, income or natural capital – this is life on benefits and there is no future for young people in it.  In contrast, wherever nature is allowed to flourish, it’s capital potential is wondrous.  In 2009, the RSPB’s lovely but very small reserves brought £66 million to local economies, and created 1,872 FTE jobs. This is more than all of England’s grouse moors, but in just a fraction of their land area.

Right now, however, we are just seeing snapshots of how nature can power and rekindle communities. In Rebirding we often look to other countries to see how true ecosystems could transform economies on a far greater scale.   The final myth that we kick into touch is that Britain is short of space, 94% of our country is not built upon. Most of this area does not create essential food supplies – and is jobs-poor.

Is there one single practise or cultural shift that would be of most benefit to restoring natural ecosystems?

The Forestry Commission is the largest single land manager in Britain.  It now needs to split its forests in two – rewilding key estates like the New Forest and the Forest of Dean: cutting down the spruce and replanting with native trees, then, crucially, leaving large native animals such as Beavers, Elk, cattle and horses to become the foresters.  Economies in these forests would be driven through ecotourism revenues and perhaps some hunting.  Elsewhere, timber forests would remain.  It is hard to think of one single decision that could effect a greater transformation on British land than a decision to return Britain’s once world-class oak-lands to our nation.  Another, however, would be if Scotland’s deer estates, which again cover an area twice the size of Yellowstone, could be incentivised to rewild and regrow their trees.  Hunting could remain – but in this regrowing wilderness would be the potential for Elk, Lynx, Wildcats and a huge expansion in woodland species like Capercaillie. 

Are you optimistic for the future of Britain’s wildlife?

Yes – but only if our conservationists act with the same pragmatism and determination as those who have prevented land reform for decades.  In my closing chapter, I’ve argued that whilst farming unions behave with absolute conviction and coherence, our nature charities often simply say that a few more Skylarks would be nice.  Only if we can unlock the economic arguments of nature, and harness the millions of voices effectively, will we see large areas rewilded in our country.  It is the social and economic transformation that nature provides that needs to be realised – but for that, you need space, and power over land.  At that moment, things will change. In my lifetime, I genuinely believe that after many fierce battles, we will see Dalmatian Pelicans flying over Somerset, and huge areas of Scotland, Wales and upland England slowly returned to a wilder state.  But without absolute conviction this is possible, it will never come to pass.

Benedict Macdonald’s book is out now as part of our Spring Promotion

To discover further reading on the past, present and future of the British countryside, browse our collection.

Supporting Conservation: National Museum of Brazil

On 2nd September last year, a terrible fire destroyed the National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro. Alongside the vast collection of irreplaceable natural history specimens, the fire also destroyed books and equipment used by the Museum’s researchers for ecological research and wildlife conservation.

Thankfully as museum curator, Débora Pires, wrote shortly after the incident: “The brains did not burn; we are working with a positive agenda!”

A selection of books kindly donated

NHBS were approached by our former director Alan Martin, who provided a list of products which the malacology, arachnology, entomology and lepidoptera departments needed to get back on their feet. Alan, now secretary of the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest Trust (BART) has close links with many researchers at the museum.

Following this, we decided to coordinate an effort to provide the items that are most critical to their research. We contacted suppliers asking them to contribute and we agreed to supply our own manufactured products, and cover shipping costs of all donated items.

The response from suppliers was fantastic, as the majority were happy to donate all, or most of the items requested. We would like to give huge thanks those who have donated so far: Elsevier, BIOTOPE Parthenope, Brunel Microscopes Ltd, BugDorm, CABI Publishing, Harvard University Press, the Royal Museum for Central Africa, Watkins & Doncaster and finally EntoSphinx. So far, we have received just over £2,000 worth of items, with more to follow.

A selection of items that are being sent in the first shipment.

“I’m really sorry to hear such devastating news. This is truly awful and it’s good to see you are providing such great support to them. We would be happy to send out the [requested] book gratis.” – Linda Jackson, Elsevier

Are you a supplier, publisher or manufacturer and would like to donate books or equipment to this worthy cause? Please contact ruddin@nhbs.com

Visit our Supporting Conservation page for more ways NHBS help wildlife, ecology and conservation across the world.

NHBS Guide to Night Vision and Thermal Optics

There are many scenarios where our attempts to observe and survey certain species are hampered by our limited sensory systems. Many animals are difficult to detect because they utilise cryptic colouration or disruptive patterns, or they have evolved ingenious behaviours to conceal themselves within their environment. In other cases, environmental conditions such as low light levels or fog, can reduce visibility and disguise even some of our most obvious resident species.

Ecologists, researchers and amateur wildlife enthusiasts have overcome these sensory limitations by using thermal imaging and night vision optics. This article will cover how these different technologies function, highlight their key specifications and give recommendations for those looking to purchase one of these devices.

© Dûrzan cîrano

Thermal Imaging

Thermal imaging works by using an electronic detector element to convert the infrared light (heat) emitted by objects in the environment into a visible pattern of colours that vary depending on the temperature of the object. Thermal imaging devices (TIDs) are becoming increasingly common in ecological surveys because, unlike night vision devices, they can produce an image in daylight or complete darkness, even through fog.

When choosing a TID there are a few key technical specifications that you should consider for your project:

  • Resolution – The clarity of the images/videos is determined by the number of heat sampling points. The higher the resolution, the easier it is to spot small animals at a distance.
  • Refresh Rate – Determines how often the screen is updated with a new image. A refresh rate of 30Hz or more is recommended for fast-moving animals such as birds and bats.
  • Zoom – This is particularly useful for larger species identification and counting your target more accurately.
  • Field of View (FOV) – The horizontal and vertical angle of view that you can see through the thermal imaging device. A wider field of view is useful when detecting small animals.
  • Maximum Detection Range – Gives an indication of how far the device will be able to detect a human-sized object effectively.
Pulsar Axion XM38

This thermal monocular has a compact, ergonomic design and features all the excellent capabilities of Pulsar’s more advanced thermal imaging devices.

  • Refresh rate: 50Hz
  • Sensor resolution: 320 x 240p
  • Digital zoom: 2x, 4x
  • Field of view: 5.8° horizontal
  • Max Detection Range: 1700m
  • Video Recording: Yes
  • Streaming capabilities: Yes
  • Price: £2,059.99



See the full range of Pulsar Axion models

Pulsar Helion XP50

A powerful thermal imaging monocular with an impressive resolution and detection range, as well as full remote control through the Stream Vision app on a smartphone or tablet.

  • Refresh rate: 50Hz
  • Sensor resolution: 640 x 480p
  • Digital zoom: 2x, 4x, 8x
  • Field of view: 12.4°
  • Max Detection Range: 1800m
  • Video Recording: Yes
  • Streaming capabilities: Yes
  • Price: £3,949.99

See the full range of Pulsar Helion XP & XQ models

Seek Thermal CompactPRO FF

Designed to be used with a smartphone or tablet these compact thermal detectors can be easily transported and are excellent for impromptu use.

  • Refresh rate: 15Hz
  • Sensor resolution: 320 x 240p
  • Digital zoom: 2x
  • Field of view: 32°
  • Max Detection Range: 550m
  • Video Recording: Yes
  • Streaming capabilities: No
  • Price: £479.95

See the full range of Seek Compact models

Seek Shot

Designed to be used quickly and conveniently, these pocket-sized devices are excellent for obtaining thermal images of species such as bats when they are roosting in crevices and cavities. It is also available in a Pro version which has a greater sensor resolution and field of view.

  • Refresh rate: <9Hz
  • Sensor resolution: 206 x 156p
  • Field of view: 36° horizontal
  • Max Detection Range: 300m
  • Video Recording: Yes
  • Streaming capabilities: Yes
  • Price: £579.95

 

Night Vision

Night vision technology operates either by using an image-intensifier tube (analogue) or an electronic sensor (digital) to amplify the small amount of light present in dark environments to generate a bright image. They typically produce a monochromatic green or greyscale image, however some newer technologies are now able to capture colour images in low light conditions.

There are a few specifications that you should consider when choosing an night vision device (NVD):

  • Viewing Range – The distance to which you can see and distinguish objects using the device can be crucial for certain projects. A low-end NVD will typically have a viewing range of around 200m, while more high-end models can achieve viewing ranges of up to 500m.
  • Analogue Night Vision – These scopes are grouped into generations. Gen 1 scopes are the most economic but have a limited range (approximately 75m), lower resolution and limited field of view. Gen 2 and 2+ scopes offer performance improvements such as longer range, better image resolution and greater field of view.
  • Digital Night Vision – Digital devices typically produce higher quality images than Generation 1 scopes, often have a video output or SD card allowing video capture.
  • IR illumination – Most night vision devices have a built in IR illuminator to increase the brightness of the images it takes, however purchasing an additional IR illuminator may be necessary when working in extreme darkness.
SiOnyx Aurora

New for 2019, this innovative night vision monocular utilises SiOnyx’s Ultra Low-Light Sesnor Technology to record colour footage not only during the day but also in both low-light and night-time conditions. It also features a wifi module to stream or transfer photos and videos, as well as a GPS module to automatically geotag and timestamp recordings.

  • Digital: Ultra Low-Light CMOS sensor
  • Digital Zoom: 1-3x
  • Field of view: 42°
  • Display colour: Colour, phosphor green, monochrome
  • Video Recording: Yes
  • Streaming capabilities: Yes
  • Price: £799.99
Bushnell Equinox Z2

An impressive digital night vision monocular with a high sensor resolution and viewing range of up to 230m. It can take HD video recordings which can be streamed over Wifi using the dedicated Equinox Z2 App.

  • Digital: CMOS sensorDigital Zoom: 1-3x
  • Field of view: 105m @ 1000m
  • Display colour: Colour (in daylight), greyscale
  • Video Recording: Yes
  • Streaming capabilities: Yes
  • Price: £421.00



See the full range of Bushnell Equinox Z2 models

Yukon NVMT Spartan

An excellent gen 1 monocular that has been designed for ease of use in complete darkness. It is operated using only three buttons and features a lightweight and compact body-shell to protect against any damage.

  • Analogue: Generation 1
  • Lens diameter: 50mm
  • Magnification: 4x
  • Field of view: 15°
  • Display colour: Phosphor green
  • Video Recording: No
  • Streaming capabilities: No
  • Price: £235.00


MORE INFORMATION

To learn more about some of these products or to browse our full range of night vision and thermal imaging optics visit our online store at NHBS.com.

If you would like some more advice on choosing a thermal imaging or night vision device contact us via email at customer.services@nhbs.com or phone on 01803 865913.

BSBI: Publisher of the Month for April

 

 

 

 

With Spring finally upon us, NHBS are delighted to announce the Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland (BSBI) as our Publisher of the Month for April.

BSBI: Origins and Aims

The BSBI has a long and illustrious history as a publisher of books and periodicals aimed at both professional and amateur botanists. Tracing its origins back to 1836, the society was founded as the Botanical Society of London; from its earliest days, the BSBI has welcomed and supported everyone who wants to know more about the British and Irish flora. The society’s training, outreach and research  programmes continue to support botanists at all skill levels.

BSBI Publications

 

 

 

 

The BSBI publishes a range of botanical books; their BSBI handbooks have become standard botanical field guides, containing identification keys, detailed plant descriptions and useful line drawings, together with information on habitat and distribution. They also publish important stand-alone titles, such as Hybrid Flora of the British Isles and Threatened Plants in Britain and Ireland.

The BSBI have been instrumental in helping to publish John Poland’s critically acclaimed The Vegetative Key to the British Flora and most recently, after years of work, The Field Key to Winter Twigs – both vital reference for field botanists.

Forthcoming Publications: BSBI Atlas 2020

The first atlas of the British and Irish flora was published in 1962. It pioneered the use of ‘dot-maps’ aligned to the OS grid which influence  the hundreds of natural history grid-based atlases that followed.  Work has already started on a third atlas; Atlas 2020  will be published after fieldwork has been completed in 2019. You can find out more, or even get involved by visiting their website.

 

You can browse all the BSBI publications here

Find out more about BSBI

The BSBI is passionate about the flora of Britain and Ireland and encourages everybody to become involved.  If you are a novice and want to get started in botany, their get started page is definitely worth a visit.  And if you want to put your botanical knowledge to use, opportunities for volunteers can be found here.

BSBI’s blog often features interviews with authors such as Kevin Walker, author of Threatened Plants in Britain and Ireland and John Poland (The Field Key to Winter Twigs).

British & Irish Botany Journal

British & Irish Botany is a new online journal from the BSBI. The journal aims to provide a new forum for publishing papers and articles relating to the vascular plants and charophytes of Britain and Ireland.

British and Irish Botany will welcome contributions in a number of formats and you can find out more about this forum here.

 

 

 

 

New bird, bat and bee boxes for 2019

Providing nesting and roosting spaces for our wildlife is increasingly important as natural habitats and nest spaces are diminishing. Luckily, with the huge range available today, boxes for birds, bats and even bees can be sited almost anywhere from a tree in your garden, to within the walls of a new building and even free-standing. Below we will take a look at some of our newest bird, bat and bee boxes and what they can be used for.

introducing the Integrated Boxes by Green & Blue

The Bat Block

Green & Blue have just released two brand new products ready for this Spring.  Designed to be simple and easy to fit within the framework of new builds, the new Swift block and Bat block are sleek and made from recycled materials from the Cornish china clay industry. Both are standard UK block size and have slightly protruding entrances.

The Swift Block

Green & Blue BestSellers

As well as their new swift and bat boxes, Green & Blue also sell a range of blocks for bees. The blocks are made of 75% waste materials from the Cornish china clay industry and features small holes that appeal to a range of solitary bee species. The blocks range from small, brick-shaped blocks that can be built into walls or buildings, to large, stylish posts reaching 2.3m high, to plant pots that have space for you to plant bee-friendly flowers next to the solitary bee nesting holes.

New additions to the Eco Range

The ‘Eco’ range of boxes has recently expanded to feature a new Eco Bat Shelter and an Eco Tawny Owl Nest Box. These boxes are made of recycled plastic and the bat shelter comes in both a standard black and a brick-red colour. The bat shelter features a ceramic insert that helps to stabilize the internal temperature and is self-cleaning. The tawny owl nest box contains an FSC certified wooden nesting chamber which features built-in drainage holes meaning maintenance can be kept to a minimum. 

Aside from the new bat shelter and Tawny Owl nest box, the Eco range also includes a variety of boxes to cater for a wide range of bat and bird species. All of which are made from 100% recycled plastic and FSC certified wood and wood composite internal chambers. Click the images below to find out more.

Eco Range Bestsellers

Eco Barn Owl Nest Box

Eco Kent Bat Box

Eco Robin Nest Box

Eco Sparrow Tower

Integrated Habibat 003 Blended Box

The Habibat 003 is based upon the original Habibat box but features a blended facing to allow it to fit more seamlessly in building where the brickwork is built using stretcher/blended bond. The box provides the same internal roost space with insulating concrete and comes in a choice of three popular colours: smooth blue, smooth red or buff. If you have a more specific brick requirement or would like the box to match exactly your batch of bricks, the 003 is available with a custom facing where you can send your own bricks to be used or provide your brick code for the manufacturers to use on your box.

more information

If you would like some more advice on choosing bird or bat boxes, take a look at our previous blogs listed below or contact us via email at customer.services@nhbs.com or phone on 01803 865913.

Best Bird Boxes for Different Species 

Top 10 Bat Boxes for New Builds and Developments

Top 10 Bird Boxes for New Builds and Developments   

Top 10 Bat Boxes for Walls and Fences

Top 10 Bird Boxes for Walls and Fences

Top 10 Bat Boxes for Trees and Woodland  

Top 10 Bird Boxes for Trees and Woodland

The Importance of Nest Sites for Birds and Bees

Continue reading “New bird, bat and bee boxes for 2019”

New and Bestselling Trail Cameras for 2019

As we enter the warmer spring months many of the UK’s mammals become more active as they establish territories, build nests and find mates. Despite all this activity, observing and surveying these animals is often a challenging task. Trail cameras offer an easy, effective and non-invasive solution in many of these situations, earning its place as an essential kit piece for any ecologist or wildlife enthusiast.

Listed below are a selection of new models and old favorites from each of our trail camera ranges.

Browning trail cameras

New for 2019, NHBS has introduced a range of Browning trail cameras. These cameras boast a fantastic quality of workmanship, designed and developed in the US they are sure to become a firm favourite. A key feature of this brand is the ‘Smart IR technology’ which automatically adjusts the IR flash, ensuring crisp quality night photos.

The video below was captured on a Browning Strike Force Pro X. It demonstrates the fantastic quality of these cameras.

Image by Browning Trail Cameras

Each camera has its own unique technical specifications meaning you can find a camera to suit your project.

Command Ops Pro 14MP
An excellent entry-level camera with an impressive picture and audio quality at an economic price.

Command Ops Pro 14MP

 

* 14MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* LCD Text display
* 21m Flash range
* Also available as a 16MP camera

 

 

Strike Force Pro X
This compact mid-range camera has a fast trigger speed and an excellent picture/video quality ensuring you capture every moment in fantastic quality.

Strike Force Pro X

 

* 20MP images
* 1600 x 900p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full-colour 1.5-inch LCD screen
* 36m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.22s

 

 

Defender 940
A high-end camera with built-in Bluetooth and wireless capability and no glow LEDs to enable remote photo retrieval and minimise disturbance in the field.

Defender 940

*20 MP images
* 1920 x 1080p HD videos with audio
* No glow LEDs
* LCD Text display
* 24m Flash range
* Wireless and Bluetooth functionality accessed through the free Browning Defender App.

 


Recon Force 4K
This high-end model can take some of the highest quality pictures and videos on the market.

Recon Force 4K

 

* 32MP images
* 4K UHD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full-colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 24m Flash range
* Adjustable trigger speed and detection range

 

Ltl Acorn Cameras

These compact cameras utilise three different motion sensors to ensure footage is taken at the optimum moment. They also feature a cellular module which when used with a SIM card allows you to receive captured images to a mobile or email address.

Ltl Acorn 5310
A great mid-range camera with excellent picture and video quality

Ltl Acorn 5310

 

* 12MP images
* 1920 x 1080p HD videos with audio
* No glow LEDs
* 15m Flash range
* Trigger speed 0.6s
* Colour LCD screen

SpyPoint Cameras

Renowned for their lightning fast trigger speeds and recovery speeds, SpyPoint cameras ensure you never miss a wildlife moment.

SpyPoint Force 11D
A robust and compact mid-range camera with a wealth of adjustable settings so you can take the best footage possible.

SpyPoint Force 11D

 

* 11MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 30m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.07s

 

 

SpyPoint Solar
Builds on the Force 11D by adding a solar panel which allows you to gather footage indefinitely when placed in sufficient sunlight.

SpyPoint Solar

 

* 12MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full-colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 30m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.07s
* Compact solar panel attached to the top of the unit

 


SpyPoint Link-Dark
This high-end camera builds on the Force series by adding network functionality, allowing photos to be transmitted to a mobile phone.

SpyPoint Link-Dark

 

* 12MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full-colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 30m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.07s
* GPS geotag
* Network unit with preactivated SIM

Bushnell Cameras

With an extensive history and a range of professional and entry-level models available, Bushnell trail cameras offer a reliable choice for quality and durability.

Trophy Cam Essential E3
A fantastic entry-camera with an impressive trigger speed.

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD Low Glow 20MP Tan
Trophy Cam Essential E3

 

* 16MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* LCD Text display
* 30m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.3s

 

 

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD No-Glow
A high-end camera with a fast trigger speed and low detectability.

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD No-Glow

 

* 20/24MP images
* 1920 x 1080p HD videos with audio
* No glow LEDs
* Full colour LCD screen
* 25m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.2s

Reconyx Trail Cameras

These high-end trail cameras are a benchmark of high-quality and reliability.

Reconyx UltraFire XR6 Trail Camera
A robust camera with excellent video quality and a number of impressive features.

Reconyx UltraFire XR6 Trail Camera

 

* 8MP images
* 1920 x 1080p HD videos with stereo audio
* No glow LEDs
* Full colour LCD screen
* 25m Flash range
* Compatible with Buckview Advanced Software, to organise and map stored images.

 

Accessories

A number of accessories can be bought to help mount and secure your trail camera your camera in the perfect position.

Python Mini Cable Lock

Python Mini Cable Lock
Compatible with all of our retailed trail cameras. This versatile lock has been designed to be extremely resilient to damage and picking, protecting your camera from any potential theft.

Security Boxes
Many of our trail cameras can be contained within a matching security box which provides maximum protection when in the field. All of our security boxes can be locked using a standard padlock or python cable. Make sure when purchasing a security box that it will fit the intended trail camera.

See our full range of Security Boxes on our website.

Batteries
The batteries you use in your trail camera can influence its performance in the field. Lithium-ion batteries are one of the most popular choices because they produce a high voltage per cell (1.6v) giving a brighter LED flash and a greater flash range. Rechargeable alkaline batteries offer a more economical and environmentally friendly alternative, however, when in use their voltage decreases over time and they produce proportionately darker LED flashes and consequently, photographs/videos are less illuminated. Standard alkaline batteries are also a suitable economic alternative.

SanDisk Class Cards
Ensuring you use a high read-write speed SanDisk Class card is highly advised for all of our trail cameras. Be sure to check the maximum SD or SDXC card capacity for your intended camera as these can vary between models and brands.

Solar panels
Where sufficient sun is available, the addition of a solar panel to your trail camera can extend its recording life indefinitely. Bushnell, SpyPoint and Ltl Acorn all offer compatible solar panels for their trail cameras.

All of our trail cameras can be purchased as starter bundles which include an SD card and all the batteries you need to power the camera. The complete trail camera range can be found at www.nhbs.com

Can’t decide which camera you need? Why not take a look at our guide on choosing the camera that’s right for you.

Continue reading “New and Bestselling Trail Cameras for 2019”

20% Off Yale University Press Titles

 

Yale University Press are Publisher of the Month at NHBS, and we are offering 20% off all their UK distributed titles throughout March 2019.

A Little History of Yale University Press

Yale University Press was founded in New Haven, Connecticut in 1908 and established a marketing base in London in 1961. Its mission is to further scholarly investigation, advance interdisciplinary inquiry, stimulate public debate, educate both within and outside the classroom, and enhance cultural life. They publish a diverse selection of specialist and general interest wildlife, ecology and environment titles.

Top Five Yale University press titles at NHBS

The Empire of the Eagle: An Illustrated Natural History
Hardback | Nov 2018| £23.99 £29.99
A gorgeous appreciation of eagles, this book will dazzle both eye and imagination.

 

Vietnam: A Natural History
Paperback| Jan 2008| £16.79 £20.99
The first comprehensive account of Vietnam’s natural history in English.

 

Amazing Rare Things: The Art of Natural History in the Age of Discovery
Paperback| Sep 2015| £13.59 £16.99
David Attenborough joins expert colleagues to explore how artists portrayed the natural world during an era of burgeoning scientific interest.

Belonging on an Island: Birds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai`i
Hardback| June 2018| £31.99 £39.99
A lively, rich natural history of Hawaiian birds that challenges existing ideas about what constitutes biocultural nativeness and belonging.

 

Burn Out: The Endgame for Fossil Fuels 
Paperback| April 2018| £10.39 £12.99
An insight of what a radically different energy future may look like and how we can prepare for it.

Just Published and Forthcoming

 

 

Yale University Press continue to publish some great books in 2019, from Biodiversity and Climate Change to A Natural History of Beer and Nature’s Giants.

With all UK distributed Yale University Tress titles 20% off until the end of March, now is a great time to browse their range and pick-up some excellent books at great prices.

You can browse all our Yale University Press titles here.   Their publishing output covers a very wide subject range, especially history. So, please let us know if you wish to purchase any Yale titles we don’t list: if they are in-print and available in the UK, we will still be able to offer 20% off during March.

NHBS Guide to Bat Survey Equipment

Common Pipistrelle by Meneer Zjeroen on Flickr

With Spring around the corner and the bat survey season fast approaching, it is a great time to make sure you have everything ready for the busy months ahead. Over the winter we have been busy reviewing our current products, cataloging new products and even designing our own products. Here, we have picked out some exciting new products as well as some old favourites to take a look at.

The NHBS Harp Trap – Coming Soon!

Over the last few months, the NHBS manufacturing team have been working hard on developing the NHBS Harp Trap. We are currently in the process of testing and trialing our harp trap ready for its release in the coming months. Designed and built on-site at our workshop in Totnes, our three-bank harp trap will feature some innovative designs such as a winding line carrier and anti-tangling system that makes assembly and disassembly, easy and efficient. Made mostly from aluminium, the trap is surprisingly lightweight at just 15kg, whilst remaining sturdy and durable during use. The harp trap is 190cm long and has a catch area of about 4m². The catch bag is approximately 60cm deep and its entrance is about 39cm wide. When collapsed, the catch bag wraps around the disassembled frame and is held tightly with Velcro straps so that it can be neatly stored and carried in its bag. Initial feedback on its design and function has been very positive and we are excited to develop our design based upon suggestions from professional bat workers. Our standard trap will be a three bank, but if you would like a bespoke two or four bank trap, please contact us so that we can discuss your requirements.

BTHK Tree-Roost Net

Based on the design by Henry Andrews from the Bat Tree Habitat Key (BTHK) project, the BTHK Tree-Roost net is uniquely designed for trapping bats as they emerge from tree roost sites. The net is set up against a roost site prior to dusk so that it will catch any bats that emerge, keeping them safely in the bag ready for identification, measuring and ringing. The diamond shape of the net head can pivot and collapse inwards to ensure that the net fits flush against any tree, making it safer for bats and easier for surveyors. The net bag is made from fine woven nylon mesh that is soft and will not damage the delicate wings or feet of bats. The net bag can be easily removed for cleaning and features a clear plastic rim that fits around the collar and prevents bats from climbing up and out of the net when it is in place. The length of the handle is 4 meters (breaks down into 3 sections for ease of transport) and the depth of the bag is 1 metre. You may also be interested in the book Bat Roosts in Trees which is a guide to finding tree roosts.

Anabat Scout – Coming Soon!

The Anabat Scout is the latest bat detector by Titley Scientific. Due for release this March, the Scout is designed with UK and European bat biologists in mind and is tailored for active bat surveying. It can record both full spectrum and zero crossing files and stores them on a SD card with every file geo-tagged. The Scout has heterodyne, auto-heterodyne and frequency division audio that can be played through earphones or its own built-in speaker. The in/out bat counter is ideal for emergence surveys and will automatically timestamp and geo-tag every count. The small OLED screen displays crucial information without being too bright or distracting and the Anabat Scout will be compatible with Anabat’s free Anabat Insight software for viewing and analysing your data. Easy to use and versatile, this new detector is set to become popular with bat ecologists who are looking for an active survey detector.

Elekon Batlogger M

The Elekon Batlogger M is great for active surveying and full spectrum recording. The weatherproof FG Knowles microphone has a range of 10–150kHz and can record in 16-bit full spectrum. The Batlogger M also logs the GPS coordinates (via an integrated GPS receiver), and environmental temperature at the time of recording. Different recording settings (scheduled, permanent, or triggered), and different trigger thresholds (for call identification) can be set up and the device comes with its own powerful but user-friendly call analysis software package

Echo Meter Touch 2 Pro

The Echo Meter Touch 2 lets you record, listen to, and identify bat calls in real-time on your iOS or Android device. All you need is your Android or Apple device (see the nhbs.com website for compatible models), your Echo Meter Touch 2 Pro, and the Echo Meter Touch App which is a free download from the iTunes Store or Google Play Store. When plugged in, the Echo Meter Touch 2 enables you to listen to bats in real time, view live sonograms in full colour, record onto your device and identify calls to species level in seconds. If your device has GPS functionality, the Echo Meter Touch will also log the recording location and path of the recording session. There are two versions available in both an iOS version and Android version. Both versions allow you to listen to calls in real time expansion and heterodyne and you can playback in real time expansion, heterodyne or time expansion modes. The trigger sensitivity and sample rate are adjustable and three gain settings allowing users to optimise their detector to their target bat species and ambient conditions.

SM4BAT FS

The SM4BAT FS is a full spectrum detector for passive surveying use. Robust and weatherproof, it will record 16-bit full spectrum calls and can store up to 512GB of data. A versatile scheduling function allows you to set when you want to record and the battery can last up to 450 hours. The SM4BAT FS is easy to fit to a tree or post and is compatible with a variety of accessories such as GPS unit and microphone extension cables. The SMM-U2 ultrasonic microphone is available with the SM4BAT FS and is a highly sensitive microphone that produces high quality, low noise bat recordings over long distances. Easy to set up and producing detailed call recordings for analysis, the SM4BAT FS is ideal for unattended use in the field.

Anabat Swift

The Anabat Swift from Titley Scientific is based on the excellent design of the Anabat Express, but has the advantage of recording in full-spectrum, as well as zero crossing. Users can choose between sample rates of 320 or 500kHz and data is saved onto an SD card. Two SD card slots are available, allowing you to save more bat calls without changing cards. The Swift also has a built-in GPS receiver that automatically sets the clock, calculates sunset and sunrise times and records the location of the device. It will also record automatically from sunrise to sunset every night (based on GPS coordinates) as one of the automatic recording settings.

BatLure

The BatLure can be used as a lure to improve catch rates of bats for survey or research, to attract bats to new artificial roosts such as bat boxes or constructed hibernacula, with bat detectors at training events or prior to bat walks and for calibration of bat detectors. The Batlure can playback sounds with frequencies of up to 100kHz and is capable of playing both real time and time expanded recordings of bat vocalisations. It is very compact and robust and has a tripod attachment mount, making it easy to set-up in your desired location. It plays sounds from an SD card which is supplied complete with several pre-loaded recordings. Users can also add their own recordings onto the card.

Ecotone Ultra Thin Series M mist net for bats

The Ecotone Ultra Thin Series M is ideal for catching bats and is available in 2 mesh sizes. Both are made from nylon (0.8mm monofilament) and have 4 shelves. Available in lengths from 3m to 21m, you can pick the mesh size and length that best suits your survey and situation.

 

Explorer Premium Digital Endoscope Camera

The Explorer Premium Digital Endoscope is lightweight and easy to operate. It can record still images or video on to a microSD / microSDHC card (not included). The screen can be detached whilst the camera is in operation and viewed up to 10m away. The camera head has a diameter of 9mm and the cable is 91cm long, giving easy access to nest boxes, burrows, nests, crevices etc. Lighting levels can be adjusted to minimise disturbance to animals.

Accessories

Below are some accessories that may come in use when surveying bats:

Petzl Actik Headtorch
£39.95

Stainless Steel Hand-Held Counter
£7.50

Animal Handling Gloves
£5.69 5.99

dialMax Vernier Dial Caliper
£29.99

ETI Hygro-Thermo Pocket Sized Hygrometer
£21.95 26.99

Small Mammal Holding Bag
£3.60

Telescopic Inspection Mirror
£14.99 16.99

High Flier Mist Net Support System (for Bats)
 from £695.00

Further Reading

Below are some books that may come in use when surveying bats:

Bat Roosts in Trees£39.99
British Bat Calls £18.99
Bat Surveys for Professional Ecologists£29.99
The Bat Worker’s Manual£17.99

A note on licensing

Please note that in the UK, all bats and their resting or breeding places are protected by law. Any bat survey work must be undertaken by a licensed bat ecologist and when purchasing certain products, we ask you to confirm your lisence or give an appropriate reference. For more information, please visit https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/bat-licences.

Popular Titles on Climate Change

 

There has been a wealth of climate change-based publications in recent times reflecting the growing urgency of this issue. In this blog post, we present a selection of thought-provoking titles on climate change, from handbooks for how we should proceed into the future, to how climate change has and may impact biodiversity on a more local scale

 

There Is No Planet B: A Handbook for the Make or Break Years
Paperback | Feb 2019| £8.99 £16.99
What we can do about climate change, laid out in an accessible and entertaining way, filled with astonishing statistics and analysis.

 

The Uninhabitable Earth: A Story of the Future
Hardback | Feb 2019| £16.99 £20.99
An alarming discussion into the far-reaching effects of climate change on the Human population.

 

Climate Change and British Wildlife
Hardback | Oct 2018| £29.99 £34.99
A thoroughly researched and timely account of climate change in the British Isles.

 

Achieving the Paris Climate Agreement Goals
Hardback | Feb 2019| £37.99 £44.99
A detailed book presenting the pathways to achieve 100% renewable energy by 2050, globally and across ten geographical regions.

 

The Human Planet: How We Created the Anthropocene
Hardback | June 2018| £8.99
Tracing our environmental impact the authors show what the new epoch means for the future of humanity and the planet.

 

The Wizard and the Prophet: Science and the Future of Our Planet
Paperback | Jan 2019| £12.99
This deeply researched book portrays the intellectual legacy of two environmental pioneers and their crucial influence on today’s debates.

Biodiversity and Climate Change: Transforming the Biosphere
Paperback | Feb 2019 | 29.99
This comprehensive volume captures the sweep of climate change influences on the biosphere.

 

Green and Prosperous Land: A Blueprint for Rescuing the British Countryside
Hardback | March 2019 | £13.99 £16.99
An economist’s approach to environmentalism, including a summary of Britain’s green assets and an achievable 25-year plan to a green and prosperous world.

 

Oceans in Decline
Paperback | March 2019 | £19.99 £22.99
This book identifies and describes the changes occurring in all marine ecosystems, and discusses the long-passed state of equilibrium

 

All prices in this article are correct at the time of posting (February 2019)

You can also browse our full range of climate change books on our website.

 

NHBS Guide to newt survey equipment

 

Great Crested Newt. Image  by Lottie

Great Crested Newts are the UK’s most strictly protected amphibian, requiring licensed ecological surveys if a development may affect them. As the first signs of spring emerge, ecologists are preparing for the start of this year’s newt survey season. Below, we have compiled a list of the most common newt survey methods and the equipment needed for each, so that you can ensure you have everything you need as the survey season approaches.

Netting

Netting for adult and larval newts can be a useful tool in both survey and relocation. Here at NHBS, we have designed an amphibian net specifically for the safe and efficient capture of newts. The net bag is attached by a wide velcro collar which prevents newts from becoming caught between the frame and the bag. The bag can also be removed from the frame to be disinfected between sites. The seams have been carefully placed so that they do not come into contact with the front edge of the net, and the material of the bag is a soft 2mm mesh. The net head is 300mm wide and comes with a sturdy, wooden 1.2m handle. We also sell a diamond-shaped amphibian net that comes in either standard depth or deep. Its shape is ideal for easy and safe capture for amphibians and is also available in a collapsible frame for easy transport between sites.

eDNA

The presence of Great Crested Newts can be determined by analysing pond water samples for newt DNA. This process is known as eDNA sampling and is a recent but very effective way of newt surveying that causes very little disturbance to the newts themselves. Provided that the sampling and analysis protocol complies with DEFRA guidance and that samples are collected between 15th April and 30th June, then eDNA test results are accepted by Natural England and Natural Resources Wales. This year, NHBS has once again teamed up with eDNA laboratory, Nature Metrics to deliver a complete Great Crested Newt eDNA analysis service. Combining our expertise in sourcing, packing and shipping equipment with the excellent laboratory proficiency of Nature Metrics, this partnership facilitates a fast and efficient service. If you would like to find out more about the eDNA services that Nature Metrics provide, please visit www.naturemetrics.co.uk

Dewsbury Trapping

The Dewsbury trap is an innovative design of newt refuge trap that is exclusive to NHBS. The clever design of this trap ensures that any trapped newts have access to both fresh air at the top of the trap and a thermally stable refuge at the bottom of the pond. They can be easily deployed from the edge of the pond meaning that not only is this trap safer for newts, but it is also safer and more convenient for surveyors too. In preliminary trials the Dewsbury trap was found to be more effective at catching newts than traditional bottle trapping methods and can be left unattended for up to 24 hours meaning night visits are not necessarily required.

Please note: we recommend that you contact your national licensing authority (Natural England, Natural Resources Wales, Scottish Natural Heritage, etc) before you purchase this trap. The Dewsbury Newt Trap is not included within either the Level 1 or Level 2 Natural England Class Survey Licence and a separate licence is required

Bottle Trapping

Bottle trapping is a popular method of surveying for both detecting and assessing populations. It can, however, become quite labour intensive, especially if you are looking to cut bottles into traps yourself. To save yourself some valuable time, we sell pre-cut bottle traps with the head inverted and ready to deploy. These can be bought in packs of 40 or 120 and are cut from 2l PET bottles with a 28mm neck diameter. Alternatively, we sell the whole bottles if you would rather cut the traps yourself.

Torching

Torching is a less invasive and effective method of counting/observing newts without the need for capturing them. Torches are recommended to be between 500,000 and one million candlepower and need to ideally last several hours at a time. The Cluson CB2 range is very popular among ecologists and provides 1 million candlepower with long lasting battery life and an easy-to-use pistol type grip. For a more lightweight and economical option, the LED Lenser is a powerful torch that offers up to 450 lumens and a sharply focused circular beam that can last up to 300 hours on a low power setting.

 

Drift Fencing

Fencing can either be used to temporarily exclude or contain newts in mitigation projects. It can also be used to aid the capture of newts for relocation and is typically a short barrier with the base buried underground. Our Tristar Newt Fencing comes in rolls of 100m, is made of UV stabilised polythene sheeting and tinted green. It is designed to resist weather damage and has a life expectancy of 5 years, making it ideal for temporary mitigation projects during development works. It is easy and simple to put up and can be fixed into place with our soft wood stakes.

Pitfall Traps

Often, pitfall traps are used alongside drift fencing in order to trap and translocate newts in relocation projects. They consist of a container that is buried underground often flush with the edge of drift fencing. Both square buckets and round buckets have been shown to be effective and we supply several options depending on your preferences.

Accessories

Below are some accessories that may come in use when surveying Great Crested Newts: 

 

Light & Dry Micro First Aid Kit
£15.95 16.99

Bamboo Canes
From £13.00 for 100

dialMax Vernier Dial Caliper
£29.99 45.00

Snowbee Granite PVC Thigh Waders
£40 (various sizes)

Snowbee Lightweight Neoprene Gloves
£12.95 (various sizes)

Replacement Amphibian Net Bag
£26.99

Broad Spectrum Disinfectant Tablets
£19.99

Breaksafe Thermometer
£7.50

A note on licensing

Please note that Great Crested Newts and its habitat are protected by law. Any Great Crested Newt survey work must be undertaken by a licensed ecologist. Different levels of license are required for different survey and mitigation methods. For more information, please visit https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/great-crested-newt-licences#great-crested-newt-survey-and-research-licences