NHBS Guide: How to choose a Trail Camera

As we enter the warmer spring months many of the UK’s mammals become more active as they establish territories, build nests and find mates. Despite all this activity, observing and surveying these animals is often a challenging task. Trail cameras offer an easy, effective and non-invasive solution in many of these situations, earning their place as an essential kit piece for any ecologist or wildlife enthusiast.

Listed below are a selection of new models and old favourites from each of our trail camera ranges.

Browning trail cameras

New for 2019, NHBS has introduced a range of Browning trail cameras. These cameras boast a fantastic quality of workmanship, designed and developed in the US they are sure to become a firm favourite. A key feature of this brand is the ‘Smart IR technology’ which automatically adjusts the IR flash, ensuring crisp quality night photos.

The video below was captured on a Browning Strike Force Pro X. It demonstrates the fantastic quality of these cameras.

Image by Browning Trail Cameras

Command Ops Pro 14MP
An excellent entry-level camera with an impressive picture and audio quality at an economic price.

Command Ops Pro 14MP

 

* 14MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* LCD Text display
* 21m Flash range
* Also available as a 16MP camera

 

 

Strike Force Pro X
This compact mid-range camera has a fast trigger speed and an excellent picture/video quality ensuring you capture every moment in fantastic quality.

Strike Force Pro X

 

* 20MP images
* 1600 x 900p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full-colour 1.5-inch LCD screen
* 36m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.22s

 

 

Defender 940
A high-end camera with built-in Bluetooth and wireless capability and no glow LEDs to enable remote photo retrieval and minimise disturbance in the field.

Defender 940

*20 MP images
* 1920 x 1080p HD videos with audio
* No glow LEDs
* LCD Text display
* 24m Flash range
* Wireless and Bluetooth functionality accessed through the free Browning Defender App.

 


Recon Force 4K
This high-end model can take some of the highest quality pictures and videos on the market.

Recon Force 4K

 

* 32MP images
* 4K UHD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full-colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 24m Flash range
* Adjustable trigger speed and detection range

 

Bushnell Cameras

With an extensive history and a range of professional and entry-level models available, Bushnell trail cameras offer a reliable choice for quality and durability.

Bushnell Trophy Cam Essential E3
A fantastic entry-camera with an impressive trigger speed.

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD Low Glow 20MP Tan
Trophy Cam Essential E3

 

* 16MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* LCD Text display
* 30m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.3s

 

 

Bushnell CORE DS Low-Glow
This high-end camera has a fantastic trigger speed and recovery speed, as well as an extremely high picture and video quality. It uses two sensors, one for day and one for night conditions, which together ensure footage is always sharp.

Bushnell DS CORE Low-Glow

 

* 30MP images
* 1920×1080p HD video with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Front-facing Colour display
* 30m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.2s
* Dual Sensor for day and night recordings
* Also available as a no-glow model

SpyPoint Cameras

Renowned for their lightning fast trigger speeds and recovery speeds, SpyPoint cameras ensure you never miss a wildlife moment.

SpyPoint Force-Dark
A robust and compact mid-range camera with a wealth of adjustable settings so you can take the best footage possible.

SpyPoint Force-Dark


* 12MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* No glow LEDs
* Full-colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 27m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.07s
* 16GB SD card and card reader included

 

SpyPoint Solar-Dark
Builds on the Force-Dark by adding a solar panel which allows you to gather footage indefinitely when placed in sufficient sunlight.

SpyPoint Solar-Dark

 

* 12MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* No glow LEDs
* Full-colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 27m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.07s
* 16GB SD card and card reader included
* Compact solar panel attached to the top

 


SpyPoint Link-Dark
This high-end camera builds on the Force series by adding network functionality, allowing photos to be transmitted to a mobile phone.

SpyPoint Link-Dark

 

* 12MP images
* 1280 x 720p HD videos with audio
* Low glow LEDs
* Full-colour 2-inch LCD screen
* 30m Flash range
* Fast trigger speed of 0.07s
* GPS geotag
* Network unit with preactivated SIM

Ltl Acorn Cameras

These compact cameras utilise three different motion sensors to ensure footage is taken at the optimum moment. They also feature a cellular module which when used with a SIM card allows you to receive captured images to a mobile or email address.

Ltl Acorn 5310
A great mid-range camera with excellent picture and video quality

Ltl Acorn 5310

 

* 12MP images
* 1920 x 1080p HD videos with audio
* No glow LEDs
* 15m Flash range
* Trigger speed 0.6s
* Colour LCD screen

Reconyx Trail Cameras

These high-end trail cameras are a benchmark of high-quality and reliability.

Reconyx UltraFire XR6 Trail Camera
A robust camera with excellent video quality and a number of impressive features.

Reconyx UltraFire XR6 Trail Camera

 

* 8MP images
* 1920 x 1080p HD videos with stereo audio
* No glow LEDs
* Full colour LCD screen
* 25m Flash range
* Compatible with Buckview Advanced Software, to organise and map stored images.

 

Accessories

A number of accessories can be bought to help mount and secure your trail camera your camera in the perfect position.

Python Mini Cable Lock

Python Mini Cable Lock
Compatible with all of our retailed trail cameras. This versatile lock has been designed to be extremely resilient to damage and picking, protecting your camera from any potential theft.

Security Boxes
Many of our trail cameras can be contained within a matching security box which provides maximum protection when in the field. All of our security boxes can be locked using a standard padlock or python cable. Make sure when purchasing a security box that it will fit the intended trail camera.

See our full range of Security Boxes on our website.

Batteries
The batteries you use in your trail camera can influence its performance in the field. Lithium-ion batteries are one of the most popular choices because they produce a high voltage per cell (1.6v) giving a brighter LED flash and a greater flash range. Rechargeable alkaline batteries offer a more economical and environmentally friendly alternative, however, when in use their voltage decreases over time and they produce proportionately darker LED flashes and consequently, photographs/videos are less illuminated. Standard alkaline batteries are also a suitable economic alternative.

SanDisk Class Cards
Ensuring you use a high read-write speed SanDisk Class card is highly advised for all of our trail cameras. Be sure to check the maximum SD or SDXC card capacity for your intended camera as these can vary between models and brands.

Solar panels
Where sufficient sun is available, the addition of a solar panel to your trail camera can extend its recording life indefinitely. Bushnell, SpyPoint and Ltl Acorn all offer compatible solar panels for their trail cameras.

All of our trail cameras can be purchased as starter bundles which include an SD card and all the batteries you need to power the camera. The complete trail camera range can be found at www.nhbs.com

Can’t decide which camera you need? Why not take a look at our guide on choosing the camera that’s right for you.

Continue reading “NHBS Guide: How to choose a Trail Camera”

Watching Wildlife – How to choose the right Nest Box Camera

This is part two of a two-part series that will look into different ways of watching wildlife in your back garden. Part one looked at trail cameras. This second part looks at nest box cameras and offers advice on what to look out for when buying one.


There is a whole world of wildlife in our back gardens, but often these creatures can be elusive or hidden away.  Our range of wildlife equipment can offer you an amazing insight into their world from the comfort of your house, without the risk of disturbing your wildlife.

Come early spring, our garden birds will begin their breeding season. Placing a nest box in your garden will not only give breeding pairs a helping-hand in finding somewhere safe to have their young. But it also provides an opportunity for you to get up close and personal with the goings-on inside with the use of a nest box camera. There are several options and kits out there and a few things to think about when it comes to picking a nest box camera. Here, I will offer some advice and options to ensure you can find the kit that is right for you.

nest box camera
A glimpse into the nest box by Simon Redwood via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).
Wired, Wireless or WiFi?

The difference in nest box cameras come mainly in the way that you receive images from the camera itself. These are either wired, wireless or WiFi. Wired kits can provide better, higher quality, more reliable images, but are sometimes not as convenient as Wireless or WiFi kits.

IP nest box cameras are also wired cameras, however they are powered and transmit footage via supplied Ethernet cables. These cameras offer the greatest video quality available as well as the ability to remotely view your footage on a computer or smartphone.

Note that wireless or WiFi cameras still require power from either the mains (extension leads are available to buy separately) or from an external rechargeable battery.

Kit Contents

If you are completely new to nest boxes and nest box cameras, complete kits are available with a nest camera already mounted inside a nest box. Alternatively, if you are looking to purchase a nest box camera, but you already have a nest box, then you can buy nest box cameras separately

Viewing your footage

You can view your footage in a variety of ways depending on what camera or extra equipment you have.

Wired cameras – These plug straight into your TV with an AV cable. However if you want to view and record footage on your laptop or computer, you can buy a USB video capture device for both Windows and MacOS. The software included with these USB devices also allows you to set up motion detection or schedule recordings.


Wireless
– These cameras transmit their footage to a receiver which can then plug directly into your TV using the provided AV connectors, or into your PC or laptop via a USB capture device.

 

WiFi – These cameras transmit their footage over their own WiFi connection. This means you can connect your smartphone, tablet or PC to the camera’s WiFi to view or record footage.

 

IP – These cameras transmit their footage via long Ethernet cables which are plugged either directly into your router or into a wifi booster on the same network. Once set up on a PC or smartphone app, you can watch live footage of your nestbox from anywhere in the world.

If you need to use a wireless camera, a Digital Video Recorder kit is also capable of live-streaming. The wireless receiver can be plugged into the DVR which can be connected to your internet router to enable live-streaming. The DVR itself allows you to set up motion-detection or scheduled recording. You can also add up to four cameras to the DVR which may be useful if you want to watch from multiple angles or from multiple nest boxes.

Nest Box Camera
Great Tit Nest via Nest Box Camera on Windows computer screen ©Bryony James
Species

You may have a particular species of bird in mind that you are hoping to capture on your nest box camera. Our nest box camera kits with boxes are aimed towards common garden birds. The species of birds that you may attract depends on the entrance-hole size.

Nest box
Nest Box Camera Starter Kit

A 29mm hole, such as that of the Nest Box Camera Starter Kit, is suitable for Blue Tits, Coal Tits, Marsh Tits, Great Tits, Tree Sparrows and flycatchers. A larger 32mm hole, such as that of the Gardenature Nest Box Camera System, is suitable for House Sparrows, Nuthatches, Blue Tits, Coal Tits, Marsh Tits and Great Tits. It also has a removable front panel that is ideal if you are looking to attract robins or wrens.

Nest Box Camera Kit
Nest Box Camera Kit

The Nest Box Camera Kit has a removable 29mm plate that can attach over its 32mm hole meaning it is capable of attracting a range of species. If you are looking to attract anything larger or a more ‘picky’ species, then you may want to buy a species-specific nest box and fit one of our separate nest box cameras to this.

The Hedgehog Camera Kit
The Hedgehog Camera Kit – Wired camera

If you are lucky enough to have hedgehogs in your garden, why not see what they’re up to alongside giving them a safe place to nest? Our Hedgehog Camera Kit includes a high-quality wooden hedgehog nest box, designed and tested by the Hedgehog Preservation Society. It also includes a tiny camera that can easily be screwed to the roof or side of the box with no modifications required. Available with wired, wireless or Wi-Fi cameras.

Suggested Reading
Nest box
CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring – An Introduction

For a collection of handy tips, tricks and ideas, Susan Young’s book CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring is an ideal guide for photographing wildlife in your garden. Whether you are an experienced trail camera user or a newbie looking to order your first nest-camera, Susan Young’s book will offer a wealth of information to help you get even more out of your equipment.

If you wanted to read more about how to make, monitor and maintain your bird box, Nestboxes: Your Complete Guide is a great book that will guide you through everything you need to know about your nest box and its inhabitants.


Would you like some more advice on which trail camera or nest box camera is most suitable for you? Contact us on +44 (0)1803 865913 or email customer.services@nhbs.com . Alternatively, reply below and we will get back to you.

What’s new for 2017 – Trail camera news

The days are getting longer and the clocks are set to British summer time here in the U.K. With the arrival of the warmer weather, our local wildlife is also becoming more active and now is a great time to set up a trail camera to see what’s going on in your garden or local outdoor space. If you’re lucky you may even spy young animals emerging from their burrows for the first time.

In this article we will take a look at some of our new and favourite trail cameras for 2017.

Bushnell Trail Cameras

This spring has seen a new range of cameras arrive on our shelves from Bushnell, featuring an exciting selection of brand new features.

The new Trophy Cam Aggressor range is available in four models. All of these share an excellent 0.2 second trigger speed and a recovery time of just 0.5 seconds, ideal for moving animals. A new Dynamic Video function means that the camera will record continuously while there is a subject in the detection range and an Auto Exposure function helps to avoid bleached out images when the subject is too close. Three preset functions allow easy configuration of advanced settings based on the location of the camera (choose from trail/scrape, feeder or food plot). The design of the case has also been improved with a strengthened cable lock channel, stronger latch and illuminated button panel.

The four models differ in their image/video resolution, type of night vision LEDs, screen type and case colour. Take a look at our handy guide below to see which is the right model for you.

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD No Glow 24MP Camo

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD No Glow 24MP Camo
* Bushnell code: 119877
* 24MP images
* 1920 x 1080p videos
* No glow LEDs
* Colour viewing screen
* Camouflage bodyshell

Find out more

 

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD No Glow 20MP Tan

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD No Glow 20MP Tan

 

* Bushnell code: 119876
* 20MP images
* 1920 x 1080p videos
* No glow LEDs
* Text screen
* Tan bodyshell

Find out more

 

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD Low Glow 24MP Camo

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD Low Glow 24MP Camo

 

* Bushnell code: 119875
* 24MP images
* 1920 x 1080p videos
* Low glow LEDs
* Colour viewing screen
* Camouflage bodyshell

Find out more

 

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD Low Glow 20MP Tan

Trophy Cam Aggressor HD Low Glow 20MP Tan

 

* Bushnell code: 119874
* 20MP images
* 1920 x 1080p videos
* Low glow LEDs
* Text screen
* Tan bodyshell

Find out more

 

Also new for 2017 is the Trophy Cam Essential E3 which improves on the popular E2 model with the addition of low glow LEDs, an improved flash range and higher resolution images. The fantastic NatureView Live View HD is also still available and features two close-focus lenses and a detachable viewing screen.

Spypoint Trail Cameras

Spypoint produce consistently high quality cameras and their range features several models that are exciting for wildlife enthusiasts.

Spypoint Force-11DThe Force-11D has an unbeatable trigger speed of just 0.07 seconds and an adjustable detection range of 1.5m to 24.4m with a curved motion sensor to improve the detection angle. 11MP images and 720p, high definition video can be captured while no glow LEDs make your camera completely inconspicuous.

 

Spypoint SolarThe Spypoint Solar provides another fantastic option, particularly if you want to leave your camera unattended for extended periods of time. The built-in solar panel will power the camera any time that the sun is shining, only switching to battery power at night or when there is insufficient sunlight. A 2″ colour screen lets you preview your images in the field.

 

All of our trail cameras can be purchased as a starter bundle which include an SD card and all the batteries you need to power the camera. The complete trail camera range can be found at www.nhbs.com

Can’t decide which camera you need? Why not take a look at our guide on choosing the camera that’s right for you.

 

How to choose a nest box camera


Please note we have published an updated guide to choosing a nestbox camera with up to date information on the latest technology available. Some of the products described in this article may therefore be outdated or unavailable


Nest box cameras provide an excellent way to observe the exciting nest building, egg laying and chick rearing behaviours of your local birds.

Deciding which nest box camera to choose can be confusing and several questions should be considered before you make your choice: Do you need a wired version or would a wireless option be best for you? Do you want a camera that you can fit into an existing box, or would you prefer to buy everything already assembled? Will you be able to view your footage on your PC or laptop? Do you want to stream your footage to a website? In this article we will address all of these FAQs and offer some simple advice to make sure that you get the best out of your camera.

Do you want a wired or wireless system?

Wired systems have a cable running from the nest box back to your house or classroom. This cable carries both the power to the camera and the signal from the camera to your TV. A wired setup offers excellent image quality but may not be ideal if you have children or pets in your garden or if a cable running to your bird box will interfere with the gardening. You will also need to feed the cable into your house, either by drilling a hole in the wall or by feeding it through an open window.

Wireless systems do not require a cable between the bird box and the television but instead transmit images to a small receiver situated inside the house. For some cameras, such as the Wireless Nest Box Camera Kit, a power supply will still be required for the camera (i.e. from a shed or outbuilding). Other cameras, such as the battery powered Wireless Nest Box Camera Kit have solved this problem by adding a battery box, allowing the camera to run off D-cell batteries. An advanced version of this camera system is also available. This includes a solar panel which will power your camera while the sun is shining, only switching to battery power at night or on dull days.

Another thing to consider with a wireless system is that the signal can be compromised by other wireless devices in the area or by trees and other structures between the nest box and the house. In some situations this can severely affect your image quality.

Do you want a complete kit or just the camera?

If you are new to this particular aspect of watching and listening to birds, a complete kit, such as the Nest Box Camera Starter Kit or the Wired Camera Bird Box, provide an excellent and economical choice. These kits include a bird box which has a camera ready mounted in the roof. An attached cable plugs into your television and supplies the camera with power. Alternatively, if you want a wireless option, the Wireless Camera Nest Box is a great choice and doesn’t require any complicated assembly processes.

For the handyman or woman who wants to put a system together themselves, either in a bespoke or existing nest box, the Nest Box Camera with Night Vision is a good choice. The camera comes with a 30 ­metre cable and extension cables are available to purchase separately. The Wireless Nest Box Camera Kit or the battery powered Wireless Nest Box Camera Kit are good options if you want to fit a wireless camera into your own bird box.

If you decide to go for one of these options then you will need to attach the camera to the ceiling or inside wall of your box yourself using small screws. A small file can be used to file down a part of the side wall to make a space for the cable to pass through. Alternatively you might consider buying a Camera Ready Nest Box which has a clip inside for attaching a camera, as well as a perspex window in the side which helps to improve the quality of daytime images.

What about watching on your computer?

All of the cameras and kits that we sell come with either a cable or wireless receiver that will connect directly to your television. If you want to view or save your footage onto your computer then an additional USB capture device is required. These allow you to connect your camera/receiver to the USB port of your computer and come with viewing software which allows you to watch and record your footage. Available for both Windows and Mac operating systems.

Can I stream my footage to a website?

There are lots of online services which allow you to stream a live feed from your camera online. Many are free if you are happy having adverts on your stream, or you can purchase a monthly or yearly ad-free plan. Our current favourite is Ustream (www.ustream.tv). Take a look at their website for lots of great resources to help get you started.

 


Please note we have published an updated guide to choosing a nestbox camera with up to date information on the latest technology available. Some of the products described in this article may therefore be outdated or unavailable


 

CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring: An interview with Susan Young

susan-young
Susan Young – Author of CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring

Susan Young is a writer and photographer with a background in physics and engineering. She is the author of the fantastic CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring published earlier this year. This great handbook provides lots of practical information on the use of CCTV for survey and research.

Your book on CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring, published earlier this year, is packed full of practical information for the researcher or amateur naturalist interested in using CCTV to monitor wildlife. Could you explain a little bit about your professional background and how you came to write this book?

I have had a very varied career and have always tended to look for new ways to do things. After graduating, I worked using applied physics in the manufacture of aero engines, and later, after a Masters in Engineering Management, worked in a large electronics company. For the last 15 years I have been a writer and (mainly) wildlife photographer, and found my experience of great value with the more technical aspects of photography.

After using various photographic systems for recording wildlife, I came to believe that CCTV had many applications for both the amateur and professional naturalist. As I have always enjoyed doing something different, I spent the last few years researching CCTV systems for use with wildlife.

I wanted to test CCTV in more formal environments and thus I volunteered for Natural England and the Wildlife Trust. With Natural England I have been researching the use of an underwater system for studying fish in rural rivers, and have also developed a system for monitoring rock pool life. With the Woodland Trust I have developed a portable CCTV system for bat monitoring, which is being used for a research project at the moment, and which can greatly reduce the need for night emergence surveys.

With this research I became convinced that there were many applications where CCTV could be of great benefit, but that the lack of clear, relevant technical information was a barrier to wider use. The more I discovered about CCTV, the greater my enthusiasm for the subject, and the greater the number of applications that became apparent. For this reason I decided to write CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring with the aim of encouraging wider use of what I believe is a valuable tool.

Do you feel that there is a need to bridge the knowledge gap between manufacturers/engineers and the individuals using field equipment? As an extension of this, do you feel that it would improve the quality of research or survey data if people had a better understanding of the functions and limitations of their kit?

In meeting both professional and amateur naturalists, I have often heard it said that manufacturers/engineers do not understand their problems. Without that understanding, they are unable to advise on the areas of use. In addition, the biological sciences are not generally taught with an emphasis on technology, which can leave graduates unfamiliar with technical language. Companies such as NHBS and, hopefully, books like mine, can help to bridge what is a very large gap in communication.

I feel very strongly that there could be great steps forward in research and survey methods if people were more aware of the possibilities of their equipment, together with an understanding of the limitations. For the keen naturalist, there is also a great number of applications for filming for pleasure.

We have found trail cameras to be extremely popular both with amateur naturalists and researchers. How do you feel these compare with CCTV systems and in what types of situations would you recommend each of them?

This is a difficult question to answer briefly!

I have used trail cameras for many years and without doubt they are of great value for indicating the presence of wildlife, especially in remote areas, but their short filming time makes them less practical for monitoring. CCTV is much more flexible and responsive, and has the capability of giving higher quality images, especially at night. CCTV can be used with underwater cameras, and with cameras that fit into small spaces such as bird or mammal boxes.

One of the main advantages of a CCTV system is that it can be set up to record at certain times as well as being triggered by motion or event. The wide range of CCTV cameras means that variable focus lenses can be used, allowing one to zoom in to the subject, noise reduction can produce clean images and features such as ‘smart IR’ prevent over exposure of nearby objects, a problem with night images with trail cameras.

If mains power is available, the advantages of CCTV become more apparent. Recent technology means that HD cameras can be used, giving high quality HD videos, and images can be viewed live on a monitor. If the internet is also available, images can be viewed remotely by smartphone, tablet or PC.

HD analogue video (AHD or, more recently, HD-TVI) is an amazing step forward in CCTV, giving videos of great quality at a reasonable cost and without the complexity of more traditional HD methods which require some knowledge of computer networks.

You have a vast amount of experience in the field using CCTV and must have collected huge amounts of footage from this. How does it make you feel when you are reviewing your videos and come across something amazing? Do you have a single favourite video or image?

There is nothing to beat the excitement of coming across a video of something unexpected. The otter swimming underwater was caught by accident while filming fish and is very short, but still very exciting, and something I never really expected to get, although I was always hoping. I try to plan a CCTV session to reduce the number of ‘empty’ videos and to make sure that I review small numbers without letting them build up over days. That way, the excitement is always there.

Finally – if you could set up a CCTV system anywhere in the world, where would you choose?

I would choose the UK. UK wildlife is very elusive and offers a great challenge. I am an ‘otterholic’ and would love to set up cameras on the Shetland islands. I have photographed otters with a DSLR, but there is nothing to beat the excitement of filming otters in action.

CCTV for Wildlife Monitoring is available from NHBS.

 

How to choose a nest box camera

Bird Boxes
Installing a camera into a bird box is a great way to keep an eye on the nesting birds in your garden. Image by Simone Webber.

Deciding which nest box camera to choose involves a complicated tiptoe through competing technologies and equipment. Before you start watching birds you have to decide what sort of system is best for you and, crucially, how much money to spend.

The first question you need to consider is whether to choose a wired or wireless system.

Wired systems have a cable running from the nest box back to your house or classroom, which carries both power and the television signal. This results in excellent image quality but may not be ideal if you have children or pets in your garden, or if a cable running to your bird box will interfere with the gardening. You will also need to feed the cable into your house, either by drilling a hole in the wall or by feeding it through an open window.

Wireless systems do not require a cable to run between the bird box and the television but instead transmit images to a small receiver situated inside the house. However, a power supply will still be required for the camera (i.e. from a shed or outbuilding) and the signal can be compromised by other wireless devices in the area or by trees and other structures between the nest box and the house.

Next you will need to consider whether you require a complete kit or just the camera.

Nest Box Camera Starter Kit

If you are new to this particular aspect of watching and listening to birds, a complete kit, such as the Nest Box Camera Starter Kit is a good and economical choice. This starter kit includes a bird box with a camera mounted in the roof, which provides colour footage during the day and black ­and ­white at night. A 30 ­metre cable plugs into your television and supplies the camera with power. Another option is the Gardenature Nest Box Camera System, which includes a bespoke red cedar nest box made to RSPB and BTO guidelines. A small sliding drawer at the top of the box houses the Sony CCD camera, which adjusts automatically depending on light levels. A 30 ­metre cable connects the camera to your television.

Nest Box Camera with Night Vision

For the handyman or woman who wants to put a system together themselves, either in a bespoke or existing nest box, the Nest Box Camera with Night Vision is a good choice. The tiny camera will focus from a few centimetres to roughly 30 metres, with high definition for excellent daytime and night ­time images. The camera comes with a 30 ­metre cable and extension cables are available to purchase separately. The Wireless Nest Box Camera Kit is a great option if you want to fit a wireless camera to your own bird box.

What about watching on your computer?

All of the cameras and kits that we sell come with either a cable or wireless receiver that will connect directly to your television. If you want to view or save your footage onto your computer then an additional USB capture device is required. These are available both for Windows and Mac operating systems and come with all the software you require to get started.

 

New range of Bushnell trail cameras now available

Bushnell Blog Photo

Bushnell Trail Cameras are rapidly becoming the cameras of choice for researchers, conservationists and amateur naturalists around the world. Their ability to let you monitor a survey site or capture the action in your garden when you’re not around makes them a great tool for anyone interested in wildlife and animal behaviour. This spring sees the release of a new range of Bushnell cameras with a model available to suit every application and budget.

The Trophy Cam line now includes the entry level Essential HD as well as the Aggressor HD which has higher resolution, a faster trigger speed and a choice of no glow or low glow LEDs. The brand new Trophy Cam Wireless (coming soon) completes the range and allows you to send images directly to your phone, tablet or computer.

The popular NatureView camera is now available in two models: The affordable HD Essential and the HD Live View (both coming soon). The HD Live View comes with two additional close focus lenses for great close-up images of wildlife.

The new Surveillance Cam is equally suitable for monitoring a survey site near your home or for security purposes. It utilises a WiFi capable SD card (included) to transmit images or videos to a nearby phone or computer up to a distance of 24m.

All Bushnell cameras are available as a starter bundle which contains batteries and an SD card; everything you need to get started capturing great images and videos. Other accessories include security cases and cable locks to keep your camera safe in the field, a tree bracket for easy positioning and a solar panel, which will extend the battery life.

 

How to choose the trail camera that’s right for you


Please note we have published an updated guide to choosing a trail camera with up to date information on the latest technology available. Some of the products described in this article may therefore be outdated or unavailable


Trail camera technology is developing all the time and the range of products on the market constantly expanding. While this is exciting, it can also be incredibly confusing, especially when you’re trying to choose which model is best suited to your needs.

Here are six things you should consider when trying to choose the trail camera that’s right for you:

1. Type of LEDs

The infrared LEDs on a trail camera provide the illumination needed to take pictures at night. Generally speaking, these come in two types: standard or low glow. Standard LEDs have a shorter wavelength which means that they will emit a small amount of visible light when activated. This will be seen as a small red flash. Low glow LEDs, having a longer wavelength, do not produce this tell-tale red glow so have obvious benefits for wildlife photography. Low glow types, however, will have a shorter range than standard LEDs.

2. Trigger speed

Trigger speed is the time taken for an image or video to be recorded after the infrared motion sensor has been triggered. If your subject is fast moving then a quicker trigger speed will help to ensure you capture great images. Fastest trigger speeds are currently around 0.07 seconds (e.g. the Spypoint Force-11D).

3. Picture and video resolution

As with any type of camera, image and video resolution are important, and the image quality you require will depend on what you will be using your footage for, along with your budget. Most trail cameras will give you the option to alter the resolution using compression or interpolation methods. This can be useful if you are deploying your camera for long periods, when memory card capacity may become an issue. It also means, however, that you should check the resolution of the camera image sensor as the advertised megapixel value often relates to the interpolated resolution (* see note below for a definition of interpolation).

4. Does it have a viewing screen?

Having an image preview screen in your trail camera is beneficial in two ways: Firstly, it allows you to quickly check the images that you have recorded without having to remove the SD card or plug it into a laptop. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, it lets you take a few test images. By walking (or running) in front of the camera and checking the image captured, you can be assured that your camera angle and position is exactly right. The Bushnell Aggressor range and Spypoint Force-11D all have a good sized viewing screen.

5. Camera settings

All trail cameras will give you some control over the capture settings. Most will allow you to change the number of images taken per trigger as well as the length of video recorded. It is usually possible, as well, to specify the delay between photos and/or trigger events. Time lapse options allow you to take photographs at regular intervals between hours of your choice, and some cameras, such as those in the Bushnell range, can be set with two separate time lapse windows. This is useful if you are interested in both dusk and dawn activities.

6. Wireless functionality

Cameras with wireless functionality will send images directly to your mobile phone or email account. This offers huge time saving benefits, as well as reducing the amount of disturbance at your survey site. Several cameras now have wireless capabilities, and some will even allow you to alter your camera settings remotely. An activated SIM card is required to use these features. All of the cameras in the Ltl Acorn range are available with wireless capabilities.

 * Interpolation is where the software inside the camera produces a larger image by adding pixels. These extra pixels are created by application of an algorithm which uses adjacent pixels to create the most likely colour. 

Please note we have published an updated guide to choosing a trail camera with up to date information on the latest technology available. Some of the products described in this article may therefore be outdated or unavailable


 

How to photograph a grass snake with a Bushnell X-8 trail camera

This summer, NHBS customer Professor Graham Martin tested the functionality of his Bushnell X-8 trail camera, a great entry-level trail camera for anyone interested in capturing footage of their local wildlife. Trail cameras aren’t just for night snaps – they work night and day using either the trigger function (1 sec for the Bushnell X-8), where the movement of the animal activates the camera’s trigger, or with a time lapse function, where it takes photos at a defined interval (from 1 – 60 minutes).

Bushnell X-8 Trail CameraGraham has a very warm compost heap which is where these two photos were taken, and he had spotted the grass snake basking – it was too quick for the trigger (0.7 seconds), but he managed to snap it using the time lapse.

The Bushnell X-8 can take video or still images, has a 36 LED 15m night vision flash, day/night autosensor and a temperature recorder, plus many more great features – the only thing missing is that it doesn’t record sound, so you can only make silent movies. If you want to hear what sort of noises your subjects make as they pass, audio record functionality exists on other cameras in the Bushnell range, like the Bushnell NatureView.

We were particularly impressed with these photos, they really show the diversity of wild animals you can photograph with an entry-level trail camera.

Blackbird - taken by Professor Graham Martin with a Bushnell X-8 trail camera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out NHBS’ range of Bushnell Trail Cameras

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NHBS at Birdfair 2012: our biggest Birdfair yet

This year we are gearing up for our biggest Birdfair yet!

NHBS has a bigger and better stand this year featuring a new workshop area with a full schedule of events all weekend. Come along to find out more about ultrasound bat detecting, pond-dipping, wildlife photography and more. And join us in the main Birdfair Event Marquee daily for a big screen live moth-trapping event with Phil Sterling and Richard Lewington on Friday, and a ‘Virtual Pond Dip’ with Nick Baker on Saturday and Sunday. As always we look forward to meeting you there, out of the office and in person!

Here’s the full ‘NHBS at Birdfair 2012’ line-up – click to enlarge:

NHBS events programme fro Birdfair 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

British Birdfair 2012: Friday 17th – Sunday 19th August, Rutland Water Nature Reserve, Egleton, Rutland, LE15 8BT