Get involved in National Mammal Week

This year National Mammal week takes place from 21st – 29th October. Organised by the Mammal Society, this event is an opportunity to increase awareness of mammals and to highlight some of the challenges that they face. Keep reading for eight exciting ways to get involved with Mammal conservation in Britain today.

Brown Hare by Sheppy 9000 via Flickr Creative Commons. National Mammal Week 2017.
The brown hare can achieve running speeds of up to 45mph in order to avoid predators. Image by Sheppy 9000 via Flickr Creative Commons (CC by 2.0)

Submit your mammal-related sightings to the Mammal Atlas

Sightings of any mammals in the UK can be submitted to the Mammal Society website for inclusion in the Mammal Atlas. Schemes such as this allow a huge amount of data to be collected and collated – much more than would ever be possible by paid researchers or surveyors.

Download the mammal tracker app

Submitting your sightings is even easier with the Mammal Tracker app. Free to download, this app will allow you to upload photos, descriptions, sounds and annotated images of the mammals you have encountered, and provides a quick way of sending these to the Mammal Society for inclusion in the Atlas. Available for iOS and Android phones.

Contribute to the Hedgehog-watch Survey

Following the success of the 2016 Hedgehog-watch survey, this year the Mammal Society are conducting research into the effect of garden lighting on hedgehog feeding behaviour. The survey is sponsored by Kent Mammal Group, Cornwall Mammal Group, Devon Mammal Group and Dan Brown at Natural World Consultants and will involve citizen scientists filming hedgehogs in their gardens in the presence and absence of artifical lighting. Email atlas@themammalsociety.org to enquire about this survey.

Join your local mammal group

Local mammal groups bring people together in their shared passion for mammals. Most run a series of events throughout the year, including walks, talks and training courses, and they are a great chance to meet other people nearby who are excited to learn about and protect mammals in the UK. Use the Mammal Society map to find a group in your local area.

Enter the amateur mammal photographer of the year competition

The amateur Mammal Photographer of the Year competition is judged each year in the spring at the Mammal Society Spring Conference. This year’s competition opens on the 21st October to coincide with National Mammal Week. Head over to the Mammal Society website for details of how to submit your entry, and check out the winning photographs from this year’s contest.

Learn about Britain’s mammals

At the Mammal Society species hub you can download a useful fact sheet for more than 30 UK mammals. The society also publish a wide range of books including the excellent species series, the popular How to Find and Identify Mammals and the beautifully illustrated Mammals of the British Isles. For ecologists and researchers, UK BAP Mammals and The Water Vole Mitigation Handbook are useful additions to the bookshelf.

Attend a Mammal Society event

Mammal groups around the country will be running events to mark National Mammal Week. Take a look at the website or Facebook page of your local group to find out what’s going on, or head over to the events calendar on the Mammal Society website.

Follow the Mammal Society on social media

Like the Mammal Society Facebook page, follow @Mammal_Society on Twitter and search the tags #NationalMammals and #mammalweek to keep up to date with all the news and events.

 

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Identify the bees in your garden with this handy 8-page folding chart showing 28 species of bee, most of which can commonly be seen in domestic gardens. As well as the ‘Big Six’ bumblebees, the chart includes species of mining bees, cavity-nesting bees and cuckoo bees. Silhouettes show the typical life-size for each species.

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