Hedgehog Facts and FAQs

This article will provide you with lots of fascinating hedgehog facts; learn about their natural history and behaviour and find out how the hedgehog is faring in Britain. Discover ways to make your garden attractive to these spiny creatures and other ways to get involved with hedgehog conservation and monitoring. Plus, get tips on some further reading and view a great range of hedgehog houses and other gifts.

Hedgehog Facts and FAQs. Image by Milo Bostock.
The hedgehog is a unique and much-loved garden visitor in Britain. Image by Milo Bostock via Flickr Creative Commons (CC by 2.0)

Hedgehog natural history and biology

The hedgehog found in Britain has the scientific name Erinaceus europaeus. This is the same species that can be found around Europe and, with the exception of some of the Scottish islands, they are present almost everywhere in Britain. Hedgehogs have even adapted well to urban habitats where they feed and nest in our wilder areas, parks and gardens. In more rural areas they utilise woodland edges and hedgerows where food and nesting spaces are plentiful.

A fully grown hedgehog measures approximately 260mm from nose to tail and can weigh in excess of 1.1kg, although this may be considerably less at certain times of year. The body of the hedgehog is covered in 25mm long spines which provide protection from predators: when threatened hedgehogs will roll into a tight ball with their more vulnerable face, belly and limbs tucked carefully inside.

Hedgehogs are omnivorous, feeding preferentially on beetles, caterpillars and earthworms, as well as slugs and snails. For this reason they are often referred to as the ‘gardener’s friend’. During the night they will travel long distances, eating as they go, before finding somewhere safe and sheltered to sleep during the day. A single hedgehog may travel up to 2km in a single night!

Between November and the end of March, hedgehogs hibernate to conserve their energy, as there is very little food available for them during these months.

Current status of hedgehogs in the UK

In the mid-1990s the JNCC produced a review of British mammals, in which the population of hedgehogs in Britain was estimated at 1.55 million. Since then citizen science schemes such as the BTOs Breeding Birds Survey and Garden Birdwatch, together with PTES’ Mammals on Roads and Living with Mammals have all contributed data to the picture, reporting significant declines in both rural and urban areas.

This picture is a cause for concern, not only for the hedgehog itself but because, as a generalist species, their presence is a good indicator of ecosystem health. Their declines suggest a loss of key soil invertebrates and important landscape features such as hedgerows as well a reduction in habitat connectivity.

As a result of these declines, the hedgehog was made a priority species in 2007 as part of the UK Biodiversity Action Plan.

Encouraging hedgehogs in your garden

Many modern gardens are designed to be aesthetically pleasing but are not hospitable for local wildlife. Tidy lawns and well maintained fencing, although neat to human eyes, provide little to attract the humble hedgehog. However, there are a few simple tips you can follow to make your more garden more appealing to them:

• Attempt to keep some areas wild and overgrown, as this will provide secure nesting and feeding spaces.

• If you have a garden fence, cut a hole at the bottom measuring 13 x 13cm as this will allow hedgehogs to pass through on their nightly wanderings. You could also remove a brick from the bottom of a wall or dig a channel underneath.

• Try not to use pesticides or slug pellets, as these are poisonous to other animals as well as slugs.

• Provide a shallow dish of fresh water along with some dog or cat food, some chopped unsalted peanuts or some sunflower hearts.

• Make or buy a hedgehog home. This will provide a safe and warm space for hedgehogs to hibernate throughout the winter, and also for a female to raise her young in the spring and summer.

• Take care when mowing or strimming your lawn, particularly if your grass is very long to begin with.

Other ways to help

• Contribute to Hedgehog Street’s Big Hedgehog Map – by pledging to make a hedgehog hole in your garden wall or fence then registering this on the map, you can contribute to the network of hedgehog-friendly gardens that is being created all around the UK. You can also report a hedgehog sighting for addition to the map.

• Join the British Hedgehog Preservation Society – as well as raising awareness of hedgehogs and the challenges they face, the BHPS also helps to fund research into hedgehog behaviour and provides financial support to hedgehog carers.

• Take part in a citizen science project – schemes such as the BTOs Breeding Birds Survey and Garden Birdwatch, together with PTES’ Mammals on Roads and Living with Mammals surveys, provide essential data about our local wildlife, all of which would be impossible to collect on such a large scale without the help of 1000s of volunteers.

Recommended reading

Hedgehogs

Hedgehogs
Pat Morris

Presents scientific and down-to-earth information about one of Britain’s best-loved wild creatures, the bumbling and endearing hedgehog. The principal ‘popular’ book on the hedgehog for over thirty years.

 

Hedgehog

Hedgehog
Hugh Warwick

The Romans regarded it as a weather prophet, and modern gardeners depend on it to keep their gardens free of pests. Hedgehog explores how the characteristics of this small creature have propelled it to the top of a number of polls of people’s favourite animals.

 

The Hedgehog

The Hedgehog
Pat Morris

This Mammal Society booklet is written by UK hedgehog expert Pat Morris. It includes lots of general information on the biology and behaviour of the hedgehog.

 

 

Hedgehog houses and gifts

From left to right:
Hogitat Hedgehog House and Care Pack
Igloo Hedgehog Home
Hedgehog Nest Box
Eco Hedgehog Feeding Station

From left to right:
Hedgehog Feeding Bowl
Hedgehog Mug
Hedgehog Soft Toy

 

Top 10 Bat Boxes for New Builds and Developments

Schwegler 1WI Bat BoxLooking for a bat box but don’t know which one to buy? This article is the third in a three part series designed to help you to make the right choice. Here you will find our top 10 boxes for incorporating into the masonry of a new build or development. The previous two posts feature the best boxes for trees and woodland and for walls and fences.

For each box listed you will also find helpful information such as its dimensions and weight and the box type (e.g. whether it is for summer use, for hibernation or for access into an existing roost space).

The Glossary below provides a guide to the key terms used in the descriptions.

• Woodcrete/WoodStone: A blend of wood, concrete and clay which is very durable. Is is also breathable and helps to maintain a stable temperature inside the box.
• Summer: Summer boxes are suitable for the warmer months but are less likely to be used over the winter.
• Hibernation: Designed to be larger and better insulated, hibernation boxes will provide a safe and warm space for bats over the winter.
• Maternity: Suitable for the formation of colonies and raising of young.
• Access: Provides an entrance to an existing roof space such as a wall cavity or loft.
• Crevice: Provides one or more narrow roost space. Species which prefer this type of box include common, soprano and Nathusius pipistrelle, Brandt’s and whiskered bats.
• Cavity: Provides a more spacious roost space. Bats such as brown long-eared, Daubenton’s and Natterer’s bats prefer cavity boxes.
• Large cavity: These boxes allow space for flight within the roost which is preferred by brown long-eared bats in particular.


Schwegler 1FR Bat Tube1. Schwegler 1FR Bat Tube

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 47.5 x 20 x 12.5cm; 9.8kg
• Box type: Cavity, summer

 

Habibat Bat Box2. Habibat Bat Box

• Made from: Concrete and brick
• Dimensions: 44 x 21.5 x 10.2cm; 13.8kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

Ibstock Enclosed Bat Box B3. Ibstock Enclosed Bat Box B: Small

• Made from: Concrete and brick
• Dimensions: 21.5 x 21.5 x 10.5cm; 5.8kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

Schwegler 1FE Bat Access Panel4. Schwegler 1FE Bat Access Panel

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 30 x 30 x 8cm; 5.1kg
• Box type: Large cavity, access

 

Bat Access Tile Set5. Bat Access Tile Set

• Made from: Clay
• Dimensions: 25.5 x 16cm; 3.5kg
• Box type: Cavity/crevice, access

 

Bat Brick6. Bat Brick

• Made from: Brick
• Dimensions: 6 x 21.5 x 10cm; 1.9kg
• Box type: Cavity, access

Build-in WoodStone Bat Box7. Build-in WoodStone Bat Box

• Made from: WoodStone
• Dimensions: 50 x 22 x 14cm; 6.2kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

Schwegler 1WI Bat Box8. Schwegler 1WI Bat Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 54.5 x 34.5 x 9.5cm; 15kg
• Box type: Crevice, hibernation and maternity

 

Ibstock Enclosed Bat Box C9. Ibstock Enclosed Bat Box C: Small

• Made from: Concrete and brick
• Dimensions: 21.5 x 21.5 x 10.5cm; 6.7kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

Habibat Bat Access Slate10. Habibat Bat Access Slate

• Made from: Slate
• Dimensions: 41.8 x 37.5 x 8cm; 1.3kg
• Box type: Large cavity, access

Browse our full range of build-in bat boxes.


The full range of nest boxes can be found in our online shop, as well as a useful nest box price list which can be downloaded as a pdf.

 

Best Bird Boxes for Different Species

This guide is designed to help you choose the best bird box, based on the species of bird that you are hoping to attract, or that you know can be found in your garden or other outdoor space. Species are organised alphabetically by common name, and for each one we have included information about the preferred type of box and siting location. You will also find a handy list of suitable boxes available from NHBS.


Barn OwlTyto alba

• Box type: Large box with entrance hole measuring at least 150 x 200mm. An exercise platform for young owls is also beneficial.
• Siting guidelines: At least 4m high in an undisturbed area, away from roads. Boxes can be installed inside a barn if there is a clear flight path to the entrance.
• Suitable boxes:
Barn Owl Nest Box
Eco Barn Owl Nest Box
Triangular Barn Owl Nest Box
Schwegler Barn Owl Nest Box 23
Interior Barn Owl Nest Box


BlackbirdTurdus merula

• Box type: Medium box with platform-style front.
• Siting Guidelines: At least 1.5m high and preferably within a bush or shrub.
• Suitable boxes:
Blackbird FSC Nest Box


Blue TitCyanistes caerulus

• Box type – Small box with 25mm entrance hole. Will also use boxes with a larger hole if there isn’t competition from larger birds.
• Siting guidelines – Trees and walls in gardens and woodland. 1-5m in height with a clear flight path. Avoid direct sunlight and busy areas of the garden.
• Suitable boxes:
Traditional Wooden Bird Nest Box with 25mm hole
Small Bird Nest Box with 25mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 25mm Hole
Schwegler 1B Nest Box with 26mm Hole


Black RedstartPhoenicurus ochruros

• Box type: Small box with open front.
• Siting guidelines: At least 3m high in an urban area.
• Suitable boxes:
Schwegler 2HW Nest Box
WoodStone Build-in Open Nest Box


Coal TitPeriparus ater

• Box type: Small box with 25mm entrance hole. Will also use boxes with a larger hole if there isn’t competition from larger birds.
• Siting guidelines: Site boxes low to the ground unless predation from cats is a problem.
• Suitable boxes:
Traditional Wooden Bird Nest Box with 25mm hole
Small Bird Nest Box with 25mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 25mm Hole
Schwegler 1B Nest Box with 26mm Hole


Crested TitLophophanes cristatus

• Box type: Small box with 28mm entrance hole. Will also use boxes with a larger hole if there isn’t competition from larger birds.
• Siting guidelines: Trees and walls in garden or woodland. 1-5m in height with a clear flight path. There is some evidence to suggest that crested tits will only utilise boxes if they are filled with sawdust or wood shavings.
• Suitable boxes:
Vivara Pro Seville 28mm WoodStone Nest Box
Small Bird Nest Box with 28mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 28mm Hole


DipperCinclus cinclus

• Box type: Medium box with open front.
• Siting guidelines: Adjacent to natural moving water.
• Suitable boxes:
No. 19 Schwegler Dipper and Pied Wagtail Nest Box
Eco Dipper and Wagtail Box


Great Spotted WoodpeckerDendrocopos major

• Box type: Medium box with 50mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree at a height of 3 – 5m. Boxes should be stuffed with soft material such as rotten wood or bark.
• Suitable boxes:
Woodpecker/Starling Nest Box
Woodpecker Box


Great TitParus major

• Box type: Small box with 28mm entrance hole. Will also use boxes with a larger hole if there isn’t competition from larger birds.
• Siting guidelines: Trees and walls in gardens and woodland. 1-5m in height with a clear flight path.
• Suitable boxes:
Vivara Pro Seville 28mm WoodStone Nest Box
Small Bird Nest Box with 28mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 28mm Hole


Green WoodpeckerPicus viridis

• Box type: Medium box with 60mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree at a height of 3 – 5m. Boxes should be filled with soft material such as rotten wood or bark.
• Suitable boxes:
Large Bird Nest Box


Grey WagtailMotacilla cinerea

• Box type: Medium box with open front.
• Siting guidelines: On a wall (e.g. a bridge) near to fast flowing water.
• Suitable Boxes:
Grey Wagtail Nest Box
Eco Dipper and Wagtail Box
Vivara Pro Barcelona WoodStone Open Nest Box
Traditional Open Fronted Wooden Bird Nest Box


HobbyFalco subbuteo

• Box type: Nesting Basket 40-50cm in diameter
• Siting guidelines: In the top of a tree near the edge of a wood, preferably overlooking farmland or wetland.
• Suitable Boxes:
Long-Eared Owl and Hobby Nesting Basket
Schwegler Nesting Baskets for Large Birds: 40cm Diameter


House MartinDelichon urbica

• Box type: Bowl with narrow entrance.
• Siting guidelines: Directly beneath the eaves. Locations above windows and doors are often preferred, so a droppings board may be necessary.
• Suitable boxes:
House Martin Nests
Schwegler 9A-1 House Martin Single Box
Ceramic House Martin Bowl
Slide Out House Martin Nest


House SparrowPasser domesticus

• Box type: Small box with 32mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: On trees or buildings at a height of 2m or above. House sparrows are colonial nesters so multiple boxes can be sited near to each other, or terraced boxes used.
• Suitable boxes:
Schwegler 1B Nest Box with 32mm Hole
Schwegler 1MR Avianex
Traditional Wooden Bird Nest Box with 32mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 32mm Hole
Vivara Pro WoodStone 32mm Oval Nest Box
Starter Nest Box with 32mm Hole
Schwegler 1SP Sparrow Terrace
Sparrow Terrace Nest Box
House Sparrow Terrace FSC Nest Box
Build-in Terraced Sparrow Box


JackdawCorvus monedula

• Box type: Large box with 150mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: As high as possible on a building or tree (minimum 3m). Jackdaws are colonial nesters so several boxes may be placed close together.
• Suitable boxes:
Tawny Owl, Jackdaw and Stock Dove Nest Box
Schwegler Jackdaw Nest Box 29


KestrelFalco tinnunculus

• Box type: Large box with open front.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree or building at a minimum height of 5m with a clear flight path to the entrance.
• Suitable boxes:
Kestrel Nest Box
Schwegler Kestrel Nest Box 28
Kestrel Open Nest Box


KingfisherAlcedo atthis

• Box type: Tunnel with rear nesting chamber.
• Siting guidelines: Buried in a vertical bank beside a slow moving river or lake. Only the entrance should be visible and it should be at least one metre above the maximum water level. Filling the tunnel with sand will improve the chances of occupation. If possible, two tunnels should be placed together, at least 70cm apart.
• Suitable boxes:
Schwegler Kingfisher and Sand Martin Nest Tunnel
Vivara Pro WoodStone Kingfisher Tunnel


Little OwlAthene noctua

• Box type: Tubular box with a 70mm entrance hole and internal baffle to reduce light.
• Siting guidelines: On a horizontal branch at a minimum height of 3m.
• Suitable boxes:
Wooden Little Owl Nest Box
Schwegler Little Owl Box 20
Schwegler Little Owl Box 22
Little Owl Apex Nest Box


Long-eared OwlAsio otus

• Box type: Nesting basket 30-40cm in diameter.
• Siting guidelines: Wire the basket into a tree at a minimum height of 4m. Line the bottom of the basket with small twigs.
• Suitable boxes:
Long-Eared Owl and Hobby Nesting Basket
Schwegler Nesting Baskets for Large Birds


Marsh TitPoecile palustris

• Box type: Small box with 25mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: Site boxes low to the ground unless predation from cats is a problem.
• Suitable boxes:
Traditional Wooden Bird Nest Box with 25mm hole
Small Bird Nest Box with 25mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 25mm Hole
Schwegler 1B Nest Box with 26mm Hole


NuthatchSitta europaea

• Box type: Small box with 32mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree at a height of at least 3m and with a clear flight path.
• Suitable boxes:
5KL Schwegler Nuthatch Nest Box
Schwegler 1B Nest Box with 32mm Hole
Schwegler 1MR Avianex
Traditional Wooden Bird Nest Box with 32mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 32mm Hole
Vivara Pro WoodStone 32mm Oval Nest Box


Pied FlycatcherFicedula hypoleuca

• Box type: Small box with 28mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: In a woodland, preferably overlooking a glade. Boxes should be installed at a height of 2-4m. If competition with earlier nesting tits is a problem, the holes of several boxes may be blocked up until the flycatchers arrive.
• Suitable boxes:
Vivara Pro Seville 28mm WoodStone Nest Box
Small Bird Nest Box with 28mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 28mm Hole


Pied WagtailMotacilla alba

• Box type: Small box with open front.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree or building at a height of up to 5m. Areas close to grassland and water preferable.
• Suitable boxes:
No. 19 Schwegler Dipper and Pied Wagtail Nest Box
1HE Schwegler Brick Box
Apex Robin Box
Vivara Pro Barcelona WoodStone Open Nest Box
Traditional Open Fronted Wooden Bird Nest Box


RedstartPhoenicurus phoenicurus

• Box type: Small box with 40mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: On trees near woodland or parkland at a height of 1-3m.
• Suitable boxes:
1N Schwegler Deep Nest Box
2HW Schwegler Nest Box


RobinErithacus rubecula

• Box type: Small box with open front.
• Siting guidelines: Bury the box in thick vegetation. Boxes can be low to the ground if predation by cats is not a problem.
• Suitable boxes:
2H Schwegler Robin Box
Robin and Wren FSC Nest Box
Robin Nest Box
Traditional Open Fronted Wooden Bird Nest Box


Sand MartinRiparia riparia

• Box type: Tunnel, approximately 100mm in diameter
• Siting guidelines: Tunnels should be filled with sand and buried into an artificial or natural sandbank. (Banks should be vertical or slightly overhanging).
• Suitable boxes:
Sand Martin Nest Box
Schwegler Kingfisher and Sand Martin Nest Tunnel


Spotted flycatcherMuscicapa striata

• Box type: Small box with open front. Front panel should be fairly low.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree at a height of 2-4m and with a clear outlook (e.g. next to a lawn or woodland clearing). Alternatively on a building, nestled within ivy or other climbing plants.
• Suitable boxes:
Flatpack Bird Box – Open Front
Robin Nest Box


StarlingSturnus vulgaris

• Box type: Medium box with 45mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree or building at a minimum height of 2.5m. Starlings nest colonially so several boxes may be placed close together.
• Suitable boxes:
Woodpecker/Starling Nest Box
Large Bird Nest Box
Woodpecker Box


Stock DoveColumba oenas

• Box type: Large box with 150mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: At least 3m high on a tree overlooking open fields or in an open barn.
• Suitable boxes:
Tawny Owl, Jackdaw and Stock Dove Nest Box


SwallowHirundo rustica

• Box type: Open cup.
• Siting guidelines: Under ledge or rafters inside an outbuilding. Swallows nest colonially so several cups can be placed near to eachother.
• Suitable boxes:
No. 10 Schwegler Swallow Nest
WoodStone Swallow Nest Bowl
Ceramic Swallow Bowl
9A-1 Schwegler House Martin Single Box


SwiftApus apus

• Box type: Medium box with oval entrance (approx. 30 x 60mm). Where starlings are present, ensure the hole size is a maximum of 28mm in height.
• Siting guidelines: As high as possible either under the eaves of a building or in a loft space with access to the entrance through a wall or vent. A nesting mould or ring of plaited straw can be put into the box to encourage nest building.
• Suitable boxes:
WoodStone Swift Nest Box
No. 17A Schwegler Swift Nest Box (Triple Cavity)
FSC Wooden Swift Box
WoodStone and Timber Swift Nest Box
Vivara Pro Burgos WoodStone Swift Nest Box
No. 17B Schwegler Swift Nest Box (Single Cavity)
No. 16 Schwegler Swift Box
Schwegler Lightweight Swift Box Type 1A


Tawny OwlStrix aluco

• Box type: Large box or chimney-style box with 150mm entrance hole.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree at a height of at least 2.5m with a clear flight path (particularly below the box).
• Suitable boxes:
Tawny Owl Nest Box
Tawny Owl, Jackdaw and Stock Dove Nest Box


Tree SparrowPasser montanus

• Box type: Small box with 28mm hole.
• Siting guidelines: On a tree at a height of at least 2m. Tree sparrows will nest in groups so boxes can be placed near to one another.
• Suitable boxes:
Vivara Pro Seville 28mm WoodStone Nest Box
Small Bird Nest Box with 28mm Hole
Apex Bird Box with 28mm Hole


WrenTroglodytes troglodytes

• Box type: Small box with open front.
• Siting guidelines: Well hidden in thick, preferably thorny, undergrowth.
• Suitable boxes:
Robin and Wren FSC Nestbox
Schwegler 1ZA Wren Roundhouse
Vivara Pro Barcelona WoodStone Open Nest Box


 

Top 10 Bat Boxes for Walls and Fences

Improved Cavity Bat BoxLooking for a bat box but don’t know which one to buy? This article is the second in a three part series designed to help you to make the right choice.

Here you will find our top 10 boxes for installing on an external wall or fence. The first and third posts cover the best options for installing on a tree in a garden, park or woodland and for building into a new build or development.

For each box you will also find helpful information such as its dimensions and weight and the box type (e.g. whether it is for summer use, for hibernation or for access into an existing roost space).

The Glossary below provides a guide to the key terms used in the descriptions.

• Woodcrete/WoodStone: A blend of wood, concrete and clay which is very durable. Is is also breathable and helps to maintain a stable temperature inside the box.
• Summer: Summer boxes are suitable for the warmer months but are less likely to be used over the winter.
• Hibernation: Designed to be larger and better insulated, hibernation boxes will provide a safe and warm space for bats over the winter.
• Maternity: Suitable for the formation of colonies and raising of young.
• Access: Provides an entrance to an existing roof space such as a wall cavity or loft.
• Crevice: Provides one or more narrow roost space. Species which prefer this type of box include common, soprano and Nathusius pipistrelle, Brandt’s and whiskered bats.
• Cavity: Provides a more spacious roost space. Bats such as brown long-eared, Daubenton’s and Natterer’s bats prefer cavity boxes.
• Large cavity: These boxes allow space for flight within the roost which is preferred by brown long-eared bats in particular.


Schwegler 1FF Bat Box1. Schwegler 1FF Bat Box

• Made from: Woodcrete and wood
• Dimensions: 43 x 27 x 14cm; 9.5kg
• Box type: Cavity; summer

 

Schwegler 1FQ Bat Roost2. Schwegler 1FQ Bat Roost

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 60 x 35 x 9cm; 15.8kg
• Box type: Crevice, maternity

 

Schwegler 2FE Bat Shelter3. Schwegler 2FE Wall-Mounted Bat Shelter

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 30 x 25 x 5cm; 2.5kg
• Box type: Cavity, hibernation

 

Chavenage Bat Box4. Chavenage Bat Box

• Made from: FSC Wood
• Dimensions: 38 x 18 x 10cm; 1.2kg
• Box type: Cavity, summer

 

Schwegler 1WQ Bat Roost5. Schwegler 1WQ Summer & Winter Bat Roost

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 58 x 38 x 12cm; 22kg
• Box type: Crevice, hibernation and maternity

 

Improved Cavity Bat Box6. Improved Cavity Bat Box

• Made from: FSC Plywood
• Dimensions: 38 x 24 x 15cm; 1.5kg
• Box type: Cavity, summer

 

Slimline Wooden Bat Box7. Slimline Wooden Bat Box

• Made from: FSC Wood
• Dimensions: 40 x 14 x 12cm; 1.9kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

Beaumaris WoodStone Bat Box8. Beaumaris WoodStone Bat Box: Midi

• Made from: WoodStone
• Dimensions: 65 x 40 x 28cm; 4.4kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

Improved Roost Maternity Bat Box9. Improved Roost Maternity Bat Box

• Made from: FSC Plywood
• Dimensions: 49 x 26 x 13cm; 6.6kg
• Box type: Crevice, maternity

 

Low Profile WoodStone Bat Box10. Low Profile WoodStone Bat Box

• Made from: WoodStone
• Dimensions: 44 x 29 x 9cm; 4.7kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

Browse our full range of bat boxes for external walls.

Top 10 Bat Boxes for Trees and Woodland

Schwegler 2F Bat Box front panel with one of its residents.

Looking for a bat box but don’t know which one to buy? This article is the first in a three part series designed to help you to make the right choice.

The following two posts will cover our bestselling boxes for walls and fences and for building into a new build or development.

Here you will find our top 10 boxes for installing on a tree, in a garden, park or woodland. For each box you will also find helpful information such as its dimensions and weight and the box type (e.g. whether it is for summer use, for hibernation or for access into an existing roost space).

The Glossary below provides a guide to the key terms used in the descriptions.

• Woodcrete/WoodStone: A blend of wood, concrete and clay which is very durable. Is is also breathable and helps to maintain a stable temperature inside the box.
• Summer: Summer boxes are suitable for the warmer months but are less likely to be used over the winter.
• Hibernation: Designed to be larger and better insulated, hibernation boxes will provide a safe and warm space for bats over the winter.
• Maternity: Suitable for the formation of colonies and raising of young.
• Access: Provides an entrance to an existing roof space such as a wall cavity or loft.
• Crevice: Provides one or more narrow roost space. Species which prefer this type of box include common, soprano and Nathusius pipistrelle, Brandt’s and whiskered bats.
• Cavity: Provides a more spacious roost space. Bats such as brown long-eared, Daubenton’s and Natterer’s bats prefer cavity boxes.
• Large cavity: These boxes allow space for flight within the roost which is preferred by brown long-eared bats in particular.


1. 2F Schwegler Bat Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 33 x 16 x 16cm; 4kg
• Box type: Cavity, summer

 

2. 2FN Schwegler Bat Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 36 x 16 x 16cm; 4.3kg
• Box type: Cavity, summer

 

3. Improved Crevice Bat Box (Double Crevice)

• Made from: FSC Plywood
• Dimensions: 33 x 16 x 13cm; 2kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

4. NHBS Kent Bat Box

• Made from: Wood
• Dimensions: 47.5 x 24 x 17cm; 3.5kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

5. Chavenage Bat Box

• Made from: FSC Wood
• Dimensions: 38 x 18 x 10cm; 1.2kg
• Box type: Cavity, summer

 

6. 1FS Schwegler Large Colony Bat Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 44 x 38 x 38cm; 10kg
• Box type: Large cavity, hibernation and maternity

 

7. Double Chamber Bat Box

• Made from: FSC Wood
• Dimensions: 31.3 x 16 x 16cm; 1.8kg
• Box type: Crevice, summer

 

8. 1FD Schwegler Bat Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 36 x 16 x 16cm; 4.8kg
• Box type: Large cavity, summer

 

9. Improved Cavity Bat Box

• Made from: FSC Plywood
• Dimensions: 38 x 24 x 15cm; 1.5kg
• Box type: Cavity, summer

 

10. Schwegler 1FW Bat Hibernation Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Dimensions: 50 x 38 x 38cm; 28kg
• Box type: Cavity, hibernation and maternity

 

Browse our full range of bat boxes for trees and woodland.


The full range of NHBS bat boxes can be found in our online shop, as well as a useful nest box price list which can be downloaded as a pdf.

 

How to put up a nest box

We have previously looked at the best time and place to install a nest box. Now we’d like to get down to the details, and take a look at the actual process of putting the box up.

For most situations, you will want to put the box on a tree, fence or wall, so we will address each of these individually. (If you have a box that is designed to be built into a house wall or roof, then it is likely that your builder will care of this for you).

The tips below are suitable for both bird and bat boxes.


Fixing to a tree
Tree Sparrow Nest Box

There are several things to be aware of when attaching a nest box to a living tree. The most important is that the growth of the tree will affect the fitting. This means that boxes should be checked at least once a year to make sure that they are still secure. A box which has fallen to the ground is of little use to birds, and one which falls down with a nest and eggs inside is disastrous.

The most common way to put up a nest box is using a strong nail which is at least 85mm in length. It is important to use aluminium nails, as these will not damage a chainsaw (or chainsaw user), should they be left in the tree when it is felled. Nylon, brass, copper and hardwood nails can also be used but steel nails should be avoided as they will quickly rust, making them difficult to adjust or remove.

Using a screw instead of a nail can also be a good option and means that you can loosen it by a couple of turns every year to compensate for the growth of the tree. Screws are more suitable for hardwood trees as they will be very difficult to adjust in softwood. Make sure that all nails or screws are removed from the tree if the boxes are taken down.

An alternative to using a nail or screw is to tie the box to the tree. Wire and synthetic twine both work well and, if boxes are tied loosely, they can be edged upwards as the tree grows. Boxes can also be hung from a horizontal branch if they come with a suitable hanger (e.g.  Schwegler 1B).

Fixing to a fence
Urban Bird Nest Box

Hanging a bird box on a fence poses fewer problems than siting a box on a tree, as you will not need to worry about the wood growing. Use a strong nail or screw and check it annually to make sure that it still feels secure.

 

Fixing to a wall
WoodStone Swift Nest Box

To fix a box to a brick wall will require a power drill with hammer action, masonry bits and a screwdriver. You will also need wall plugs and screws which are small enough to go through the hole in the box. Using the drill, make a hole which is slightly longer than your wall plug. (You can use a piece of tape around the drill bit to indicate the depth to which you need to drill). Insert the plug and then screw in the screw, first threading it through the hole in the box. Having a second person to hold the box will probably be helpful and, if you are using ladders, make sure that you take sensible steps to ensure your safety. Appropriate eye protection and clothing should always be worn.


Head over to nhbs.com for our full range of nest boxes, aluminium nails and ladders.

Top 10 Bird Boxes for New Builds and Developments

Vivara Pro House Sparrow Nest BoxThis is the final post in a three part series, designed to help you choose from our bestselling bird boxes. All of the boxes listed below are suitable for building into the masonry of a new build or development.

The previous two posts provide suggestions of boxes suitable for positioning on a tree in a garden, park or woodland, and for siting on a wall or fence.

For each box we have provided a quick guide to the material that it is made from, the entrance hole size and the species that the box is suitable for.


Schwegler 1SP Sparrow Terrace1. Schwegler 1SP Sparrow Terrace

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: 6 x oval (32 x 50mm)
• Suitable for: House sparrows, redstart, spotted flycatchers

Vivara Pro House Sparrow Nest Box2. Vivara Pro WoodStone House Sparrow Nest Box

• Made from: WoodStone
• Entrance: 2 x oval (32 x 50mm)
• Suitable for: House sparrows, tree sparrows

Schwegler No. 16 Swift Box3. No. 16 Schwegler Swift Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: 70 x 30mm
• Suitable for: Swifts

4. Schwegler Brick Nest BoxesSchwegler Brick Nest Boxes

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: 32mm, small oval (55 x 33mm) or large oval (110 x 80mm)
• Suitable for: 32mm – great tits, blue tits, marsh tits, coal tits, crested tits, redstart, nuthatches, tree sparrows and house sparrows; small oval – swifts; large oval – redstart, pied wagtail, spotted flycatchers

Build-in WoodStone Bat Box5. WoodStone Build-in Swift Nest Box A

• Made from: WoodStone
• Entrance: 65 x 30mm
• Suitable for: Swifts

 

Swift Box Smooth Brick

6. Swift Box – Smooth Brick

• Made from: Concrete and brick
• Entrance: 65 x 33mm
• Swifts

 

Ibstock Eco Habitat for Swifts7. Ibstock Eco-Habitat for Swifts

• Made from: Concrete
• Entrance: 52 x 30mm
• Suitable for: Swifts

 

Sparrow Box Smooth Brick8. Sparrow Box – Smooth Brick

• Made from: Concrete and brick
• Entrance: 32mm
• Suitable for: House sparrows

 

Terraced Sparrow Box Smooth Brick

9. Terraced Sparrow Box – Smooth Brick

• Made from: Concrete and brick
• Entrance: 3 x 32mm
• Suitable for: House sparrows

 

Starling Box Smooth Brick

10. Starling Box – Smooth Brick

• Made from: Concrete and brick
• Entrance: 45mm
• Suitable for: Starlings

 

Browse our full range of build-in nest boxes.


The full range of nest boxes can be found in our online shop, as well as a useful nest box price list which can be downloaded as a pdf.

 

Top 10 Bird Boxes for Walls and Fences

Vivara Pro WoodStone House Martin NestWelcome to the second in a series of three posts designed to help you choose the best bird box for your garden or other outdoor space.

This article includes a list of our top 10 bird boxes for positioning on a wall or fence. The first and third posts cover the best options for installing on a tree in a garden, park or woodland and for building into a new build or development.

For each box we have provided a quick guide to the material that it is made from, the entrance hole size and the species that the box is suitable for.


Traditional Wooden Bird Box1. Traditional Wooden Bird Nest Box

• Made from: European redwood (FSC)
• Entrance: 25mm or 32mm
• Suitable for: 25mm – blue tits, coal tits, marsh tits, crested tits; 32mm – great tits, nuthatches, tree sparrows, house sparrows

2. Schwegler 1SP Sparrow TerraceSchwegler 1SP Sparrow Terrace

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: 6 x oval (32 x 50mm)
• Suitable for: House sparrows, redstart, spotted flycatchers

House Martin Nests3. House Martin Nests

• Made from: WoodStone and plywood
• Entrance: 70 x 30mm
• Suitable for: House martins

WoodStone Swift Nest Box4. WoodStone Swift Nest Box

• Made from: WoodStone
• Entrance: 70 x 30mm
• Suitable for: Swifts

 

Schwegler 9a House Martin Nest5. Schwegler 9A House Martin Nest

• Made from: Woodcrete and chipboard
• Entrance: 70 x 25mm
• Suitable for: House martins

Sparrow Terrace Nest Box6. Sparrow Terrace Nest Box

• Made from: Exterior grade plywood (FSC)
• Entrance: Three, 32mm
• Suitable for: House sparrows, tree sparrows

FSC Wooden Swift Box7. FSC Wooden Swift Box

• Made from: Softwood (FSC)
• Entrance: 28 x 65mm
• Suitable for: Swifts

 

Schwegler 17a Swift Nest Box

8. No. 17A Schwegler Swift Nest Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: 32 x 70mm
• Suitable for: Swifts

Eco Barn Owl Nest Box9. Eco Barn Owl Nest Box

• Made from: Recycled plastic
• Entrance: 120 x 130mm
• Suitable for: Barn Owls

 

Vivara Pro Seville Nest Box10. Vivara Pro Seville 32mm WoodStone Nest Box

• Made from: WoodStone
• Entrance: 32mm
• Suitable for: Coal tits, blue tits, marsh tits, crested tits, redstart, nuthatches, pied flycatchers, house sparrows, tree sparrows

Browse our full range of nest boxes for external walls and fences.


The full range of nest boxes can be found in our online shop, as well as a useful nest box price list which can be downloaded as a pdf.

 

Top 10 Bird Boxes for Trees and Woodland

So, you have the perfect space in mind for a bird box but don’t know which one to buy? No problem – this is the first in a series of three posts designed to help you make the right choice.

This article includes a list of our top 10 bird boxes for positioning on a tree in a garden, park or woodland. The following two articles will cover the best bird boxes for positioning on a wall or fence and for building into a new build or development.

For each box we have provided a quick guide to the material that it is made from, the entrance hole size and the species that the box is suitable for.


1. Schwegler 1B Nest Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: 26mm, 32mm or Oval (29 x 55mm)
• Suitable for: 26mm – blue tits, coal tits, marsh tits, crested tits; 32mm – great tits, nuthatches, tree sparrows, house sparrows; Oval – redstart

2. Traditional Wooden Bird Box

• Made from: European redwood (FSC)
• Entrance: 25mm or 32mm
• Suitable for: 25mm – blue tits, coal tits, marsh tits, crested tits; 32mm – great tits, nuthatches, tree sparrows, house sparrows


3.
Barn Owl Nest Box

• Made from: Exterior grade plywood (FSC)
• Entrance: 120 x 130mm
• Suitable for: Barn owls

 

4. Traditional Open Fronted Nest Box

• Made from: European redwood (FSC)
• Entrance: Open-fronted
• Suitable for: Robins, wrens, grey wagtails, pied wagtails, spotted flycatchers

 

5. Schwegler 3S Starling Nest Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: 45mm
• Suitable for: Starlings and overnight shelter for woodpeckers

 

6. Woodpecker/Starling Nest Box

• Made from: Exterior grade plywood
• Entrance: 45mm
• Suitable for: Great crested woodpeckers and starlings

 

7. 2GR Schwegler Nest Box

• Made from: Woodcrete
• Entrance: Oval (30 x 45mm) or three hole (27mm)
• Suitable for: Oval – nuthatches, redstart, tree sparrows, house sparrows, pied flycatchers; Three hole – blue tits, marsh tits, great tits

8. Tree Sparrow Nest Box

• Made from: Exterior quality plywood (FSC)
• Entrance: 28mm
• Suitable for: Tree sparrows, great tits, blue tits, crested tits, pied flycatchers

9. Robin and Wren FSC Nest Box

• Made from: Softwood (FSC)
• Entrance: Open (80 x 60mm)
• Suitable for: Robins and wrens

 

10. Starter Nest Box with 32mm Hole

• Made from: Softwood (FSC)
• Entrance: 32mm
• Suitable for: Great tits, blue tits, house sparrows, nuthatches

Browse our full range of nest boxes for trees and woodland.


The full range of NHBS bird boxes can be found in our online shop, as well as a useful nest box price list which can be downloaded as a pdf.

 

How to choose a nest box camera

Bird Boxes
Installing a camera into a bird box is a great way to keep an eye on the nesting birds in your garden. Image by Simone Webber.

Deciding which nest box camera to choose involves a complicated tiptoe through competing technologies and equipment. Before you start watching birds you have to decide what sort of system is best for you and, crucially, how much money to spend.

The first question you need to consider is whether to choose a wired or wireless system.

Wired systems have a cable running from the nest box back to your house or classroom, which carries both power and the television signal. This results in excellent image quality but may not be ideal if you have children or pets in your garden, or if a cable running to your bird box will interfere with the gardening. You will also need to feed the cable into your house, either by drilling a hole in the wall or by feeding it through an open window.

Wireless systems do not require a cable to run between the bird box and the television but instead transmit images to a small receiver situated inside the house. However, a power supply will still be required for the camera (i.e. from a shed or outbuilding) and the signal can be compromised by other wireless devices in the area or by trees and other structures between the nest box and the house.

Next you will need to consider whether you require a complete kit or just the camera.

Nest Box Camera Starter Kit

If you are new to this particular aspect of watching and listening to birds, a complete kit, such as the Nest Box Camera Starter Kit is a good and economical choice. This starter kit includes a bird box with a camera mounted in the roof, which provides colour footage during the day and black ­and ­white at night. A 30 ­metre cable plugs into your television and supplies the camera with power. Another option is the Gardenature Nest Box Camera System, which includes a bespoke red cedar nest box made to RSPB and BTO guidelines. A small sliding drawer at the top of the box houses the Sony CCD camera, which adjusts automatically depending on light levels. A 30 ­metre cable connects the camera to your television.

Nest Box Camera with Night Vision

For the handyman or woman who wants to put a system together themselves, either in a bespoke or existing nest box, the Nest Box Camera with Night Vision is a good choice. The tiny camera will focus from a few centimetres to roughly 30 metres, with high definition for excellent daytime and night ­time images. The camera comes with a 30 ­metre cable and extension cables are available to purchase separately. The Wireless Nest Box Camera Kit is a great option if you want to fit a wireless camera to your own bird box.

What about watching on your computer?

All of the cameras and kits that we sell come with either a cable or wireless receiver that will connect directly to your television. If you want to view or save your footage onto your computer then an additional USB capture device is required. These are available both for Windows and Mac operating systems and come with all the software you require to get started.